Madness Is The Gift That Has Been Given To Me

I feel like I did a lot of dance things this weekend, but not much actual dancing. And then I did not do much else the rest of this week, because I got sick. Poor, sad little me. 😦

Last Saturday was the day that my Royal Dance Court group holds our monthly dance party. This month we had decided to put together a big formal affair instead of our usual low-key social dances. I’m talking everyone getting dressed up, a full meal served beforehand, fancy decorations – the whole enchilada. Most of my day on Saturday was actually spent putting this event together, so I didn’t have any lessons that day. Because everyone was busy on Sunday with a different event (which I also went to), I didn’t have any lessons that day either. What? Crazy! But it’s true.

My Royal Dance Court group had actually rented out the Endless Dance Hall for our event, since that is the biggest dance venue in the area. We were all told to meet there around noon to get the place set up for the dance party that night. I spent most of the setup time doing manual labor, leaving the actual ‘decorating’ part to the ladies. As you can probably guess, my forte is lifting and carrying heavy objects, not arranging flower centerpieces and choosing which color tablecloths to put on each table. I could do those things if I absolutely had to, but the arrangement would be less ‘artistic’ and more ‘logical’ then I’m sure some people would have liked. What can I say, I understand things better if there is an order to them.
The hardest part of moving around all the tables and chairs was the fact that there were still dance instructors teaching at the Endless Dance Hall while we were trying to do this. I felt bad for them, since they were just trying to do their jobs and make some money, so I did my best to stay out of their way. I can’t say that all of the members of my Royal Dance Court group did the same, though. Luckily, we all managed to get through our work without too much trouble, and the arrangement of tables and chairs that we opted for left plenty of room on the dance floor in the middle for students running through ballroom routines. The instructors naturally migrated their students into the center and worked around the tables almost like we had choreographed the whole thing. If they had been singing along with music playing in the background, I might have thought I was in the middle of some kind of elaborate musical number!

The party itself went off without any hitches that I heard about. There was only one person that was not able to make it, but everyone else who bought a ticket showed up. I think there was even one extra person who showed up, but I can’t be sure. I saw her when she walked in about an hour into the dance party and stood by the check-in table. When I went over to go talk to her, she told me that some guy had already picked up her ticket and was holding it for her. I just so happened to know what table that guy was sitting at for some reason, so I pointed her in that direction and sent her on her way. Whether she had a real ticket or not I never found out, but dinner was already done at that point so having her there just to dance didn’t hurt anything, I figured.

Personally, I didn’t think that the dinner was super good. I know a lot of other people liked it, but I thought that it was kind of lacking. I had opted to have the pasta dish for my entrée, but they gave me the tiniest amount of pasta ever, so I felt sad. Luckily there were leftover dinner rolls after everyone ate, so there may have been one or two more of those in my belly by the end of the night. Also, I ate a cupcake. I can’t remember the last time I ate a cupcake. Or any other cake that wasn’t baked in a cup, for that matter. Huh… that sounds pretty sad when I write it out.

We had just under a hundred people who bought tickets to our formal that night, so there were a lot of people on the floor dancing. As I’ve delved further and further into the world of competitive dancing, I’ve started to have mixed feelings about going out social dancing like this (which you may have noticed, because I write about dance parties a lot less than I used to). On the one hand, going to social dances is the only real way I have to practice my floorcraft skills, which is an important thing to practice. I don’t think that I can give up social dancing completely for that particular reason.

But I also feel… stifled, for lack of a better word, when I am out trying to dance during a social. I’ve spent so much time learning how to move while I’m dancing – covering great distances with every step that I take is kind of how I roll now. Dancing with social dancers, especially people much older than me who take tiny steps while dancing, really limits how much I can travel. It feels… disappointing to dance small.

I might be able to avoid this problem if I decide to only dance Rhythm- or Latin-style dances during dance parties. The problem with that is, I’ve spent all this time over the past year-and-a-half studying nothing but International Standard, so I feel like I have forgotten a lot of the figures I used to know in all those other dance styles. That means that if I try to dance a Rhythm- or Latin-style dance, I end up repeating the same few figures that I do remember over and over again while wracking my brain trying to think of others. I worry that the lady I happen to be dancing with at the time is getting bored, and then the dance starts to be less fun. It’s a weird progression of ideas to go through in a short two-to-three minute period.

Anyway… Sunday afternoon the big event scheduled in the Dance Kingdom was a showcase performance over at the Electric Dance Hall. I actually went out to the Electric Dance Hall early in the day to meet up with Sparkledancer for some practice, since the studio was open. When I first showed up, there were only a couple of people around setting things up for the performances later, so we basically got the dance floor to ourselves for practicing, which was totally awesome. I even got control of the sound system, so I could put on whatever music I needed for the dance styles Sparkledancer and I were practicing, which made it even more productive. Woo hoo!

After about an hour-and-a-half though, others had shown up and were starting to rehearse for the show, so we lost most of the space. We ended up calling it quits shortly after that because I kept having to stop myself or change my routines to avoid running into people, so practice was becoming less productive. Plus, since all of these people were going to be performing later in the day, I thought that they should get the first crack at the space they needed, so I was always the one changing things to go around them. I couldn’t help it, I know what it’s like to perform, so I didn’t want to bother them.

I ran home to try to get a bunch of stuff done in the couple of hours between my practice and when the show was scheduled to start. I managed to get back to the Electric Dance Hall fifteen minutes after doors were scheduled to be opened, but that turned out to be super late. The parking lot was packed! On top of that, the parking lots nearby that weekend parties at the Electric Dance Hall usually overflow into were mostly packed as well! So many cars! When I finally managed to park and walk over to the building, it was standing-room only, and even then I had to fight for a place to stand where I could see what was going on. Even though that was mildly inconvenient to me, I am super happy that Lord Junior managed to get so many people to come out and watch the showcase.

Personally, I thought that this showcase went better than the last one that I attended. Last time it seemed like the whole show was pretty much just performances by Lord Scarry and some of his students. This time around, they had limited him to only eight different numbers out of the thirty-some that were on the schedule, so while he was on ‘stage’ for a lot of the event, other people got opportunities to perform as well, so the whole show seemed more… varied. I mean, I know that it’s hard to choreograph a routine, but each instructor has a certain preferred set of moves that you can pick out if you watch performances that they put together, so a lot of performances in one show all choreographed by the same instructor makes the performances start to bleed together.

The beginning of the show was where they had scheduled all of the Amateur couples to perform. There were four of them, I believe, and they were all relatively new to dancing, so it was one of those “AWW ADORBS INFANT DANCERZ” moments while watching them. Seriously, it reminds me that I was like that once when performing. Full of nervous energy, arms all akimbo because no matter how much I practiced with them they still didn’t want to work right while being watched, and seriously trying to smile for the audience to show them that I was having fun even though I wanted to grit my teeth the whole time in terror. That’s what it’s like for an amateur performer. I know that Pro/Am shares some of those insecurities, but you would think that at least the Professional-half of the partnership wouldn’t feel like that, right?

One performance that was particularly notable was a routine that was done by Sir Digler and one of his students. This lady was much older than all of the other performers that day, so the times that she was on the floor moving her arms and legs you could see that she was a bit shaky and couldn’t move very quickly. To work around that, she and Sir Digler had put lifts into the routine. So many lifts. It was almost as if every other move they did involved him picking her up off the ground. It was incredible.

What made it so incredible, if the information someone else told me isto be believed, was that this lady was like 90 years old. That’s right – Nine. Zero. And the lifts that they were doing weren’t just ones where he would pick her feet up off the ground slightly either. He did ones where he held her over one shoulder while she was in a plank position, or lifted her completely off the ground while she struck a pose, or twisting her around his body and ending with her sliding between his legs. The amount of core strength that this 90-year old woman must have had was incredible. I mean, I have that kind of core strength now, but imagine maintaining it for the next fifty-some years! Super awe-inspiring.
Excuse me for a minute… I suddenly feel the urge to do a hundred sit-ups for no reason.

Other than that one overly inspiring performance, everyone else did a good job as well. On top of the performances, the party was also set up to be a bit of a social dance. The acts were divided into two halves, and between the sets there was social dancing. Not many people actually came out to the floor and danced with me though, they were too busy in the back area demolishing the snack table. Seriously, I had been standing by the snack table while watching the first act, since that was a spot where I had a decent vantage point, and there was tons of food. When I got back to that spot to watch the second half, there was barely anything left on the table! Crazy! It looked like a gang of sharks had descended on the table after I had walked away!

After the performances were done there was supposed to be open dancing as well, but not much of that actually happened. I tried to do a couple of things with a few ladies, but there were so many people from the audience standing around on the dance floor talking with the performers or other friends that it made dancing kind of dangerous, so I gave up after a few songs. I have lots of body mass, and I worry about running into people and seriously hurting them, and then there would be ambulances, and police, and questions, and dirty looks… and I hate dirty looks. So I do my best to avoid situations that could be dangerous.

That’s really all I did this week. If I had to guess, I must have caught something being around all of those people on Sunday afternoon, because Monday through Wednesday this week I was feeling miserable, and ended up spending all of my non-work time either on my couch staring at a wall or in bed sleeping. I had taken all of this cold medication to make it through my days at the office in a semi-functional state, but cold medication always leaves me feeling a little loopy, so ended up suffering for it in the evenings. Sigh… being sick is dumb. Hopefully that is all past me now and next week can be more fruitful.

I think I even get Monday off of work, so I can use that time to get caught up on all the  things I didn’t do while I was sick. Like dance practice! Hooray for that!

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If You Happen To Be Rich And You Feel Like A Night’s Entertainment

This last week was yet another busy week for me. I’m hoping that next week will be much more relaxed. With the holidays all lined up, I may just get that wish. Perhaps I’ll even give my legs a rest for a few days next week instead of going out dancing in some way every night like I have been doing! There won’t be much practice time between the holidays, so there’s a real chance that my wish will become reality!

Well, what did I get myself into since the last time I posted? I guess I should start by going back to last Thursday night, where I attended a dress rehearsal for the showcase that I signed up to be a part of. Much like the blocking rehearsal that I went to the Thursday prior to this, dress rehearsal seemed to be awfully chaotic. The Art Director of the Fancy Dance Hall – who also happens to be the director of the showcase – did not seem to have control of all the performers during the evening.

But we soldiered on. Because we weren’t relegated to the stay in a room backstage like we will have to during the actual performance, I got to see several of the dance routines for the first time while waiting for my own cue to take the stage. Most of the routines were, as you could probably guess, Pro/Am numbers. There were only three amatuer routines by my count, and mine was one of those. One of the other amatuer numbers was done by the stage manager and set designer, and the third was an older couple whom I recognized, but could not tell you their names for the life of me.
Watching the performance that night, it was still hard for me to tell exactly what the storyline was. There were a lot of extra people wandering around on stage that shouldn’t have been in the scenes, and those people got in the way of some of the dance numbers. Because this was supposed to be a complete run-through, no one stopped the soundtrack to redo any scenes that got messed up unexpectedly. We just continued on as best as we could.

The part of the show that I was in comes near the end of the first half. My scenes went pretty well, with no extra bodies getting in my way that I had to work around. This was the first time that most of the other performers saw the lift that I did with Sparkledancer, so I got a lot of ‘Oooohs’ and ‘Ahhhhs’ from the makeshift audience when it happened, because it looks really impressive. I have done this lift now many times during practice in front of the big mirrors at the Fancy Dance Hall, so I know it looks cool, even with all the changes that we had to make recently to cut down the time.

After my dance number, I went back to rejoin the scene in the background, waited for the cue that marked my second scene. It was a little awkward – I had been told during the blocking rehearsal that all of us in the background scene were supposed to be ‘frozen’ while the new dance routine was happening, but none of the other extras on stage with me were frozen, so I felt dumb just standing there without moving while people tried to interact with me. Weird.

We all took a break after the first half of the show was finished so that everyone could compare notes. The Art Director came and found Sparkledancer and I and told us that she wanted to go over a couple of things for our scene, but Sparkledancer had to leave before the rehearsal ended that night, so we set up a time to get together on Saturday morning. That ended all of my responsibilities for the night. I quietly walked out without telling anyone after watching the first few acts of the second half.

Saturday morning I met up with Sparkledancer and the Art Director at the Fancy Dance Hall to discuss some minor, last-minute changes to our acting scene for the performance that night. Before we got into any of the changes she wanted, I asked about the ‘party’ scene that was happening when Sparkledancer and I get done dancing, where we were all told originally to freeze once the main characters started to wander around. The Art Director told me that she had decided after the blocking rehearsal that the party people freezing in the background looked weird, so she had told all the other extras in the party to continue partying, and must have forgotten to tell Sparkledancer and I. Oops…

We also talked about the ending of our dance routine, and how we returned to the party when we finished. This made it awkward when we were supposed to come back out for our secondary acting scene, since we were already on stage and the new scene has an abrupt change of temperament. Sparkledancer asked whether we should be portraying something while we were on stage to depict where this change in temperament happened.

The Art Director thought about it for a minute, and then told us it would be better for us to actually leave the stage when we finished dancing. Because the characters Sparkledancer and I were playing were part of a flashback that the main character was having, and there is supposed to be a passage of time between the scene where we dance and the scene when we return to mid-stage, the Art Director told us that it makes more sense for Sparkledancer and I to just disappear from the stage for a few minutes.

Sparkledancer offered to also do a minor wardrobe change in that few minute window before we came back onstage to further emphasise the passage of time. That really sold it for the Art Director. So, we decided that we would leave after dancing, and wait while the next dance routine went on. Once they finished and our next musical cue came up, we would re-enter the stage and stop on either side of the main character to do our scene, so it would look like he was watching this second flashback unfold right before his eyes. Dramatic!
Nothing like last-minute changes that I had very little time to practice right on the day of the show, right?

That brings us to Saturday night, the first performance of the showcase. And quite the performance it turned out to be! Both nights were sold out shows, which was nice, but I didn’t have anyone that I know coming to the show, so I was really just performing for performance sake. That’s OK though. I felt good about how my particular routine(s) went both nights. The dancing was solid, my ‘acting’ parts hit all the necessary cues, and I felt good about everything after I finished.

The overall performances of the whole show felt wildly different between Saturday and Sunday nights though, and I feel kind-of bad that the audience on Saturday night didn’t get to experience the quality of show that we had on Sunday night. That is the risk you take with running your showcase more like a musical instead of a dance recital – if things go wrong during the show, it impacts something larger than just one dance routine. In a normal showcase, if someone messes up while dancing, once their act is done you get a brand new show that starts with the next act that takes the stage.

It wasn’t just me who felt like Sunday night went better than Saturday night. One of the male students that was doing a couple of routines during the show told me during intermission Saturday night that the show felt to him “like a freight train hitting a marshmallow.” That is a pretty amazing description, and I wrote it down that night so that I wouldn’t forget. 🙂

So what made Saturday night feel like that? Well, these are the things that I either experienced or witnessed:

  • Just before my initial entrance to the stage, there is a part in the show where a group of kids were supposed to enter from stage right with a piece of furniture. The main characters then react to the teenagers being there, and it’s mentioned in the soundtrack. Saturday night, the kids were behind the curtain waiting, and then missed their cue. Rather than rush out to be on stage slightly late, the five of them dropped the piece of furniture and ran back to the green room, leaving the main characters on stage interacting with empty space. D’oh!
    There is a part near the beginning of the show where, to make a joke, the Art Director had wanted to have a random character walk across the stage. Apparently no one had been told to take up that particular part for Saturday night, so when the music changed in the soundtrack and the voice-over made the joke about the random character who should have been walking across the stage, there was no one there…
  • One of the characters was supposed to enter the stage with a large prop hanging over his shoulders. The Art Director had promised that there would be a stagehand around who would help him get the prop off his shoulders before his dance number, since the prop was heavy and noisy. Saturday night no one was there, so he ended up struggling as fast as he could to get it off, and he just dropped it in the back of the stage so he could go dance. It made a lot of noise, and was sitting there for quite a while before a stagehand finally collected it to take it off stage.
  • The green room that was set aside for the performers to hang out in when they weren’t onstage was not well controlled. Everyone was loud, and no one wanted to keep the door shut. I kept trying to shush them, and I shut the door whenever someone came in and left it open, but that didn’t help very much. Having been in a number of performances in my life, I know what it’s like to hear noises coming from backstage when you are the one on stage trying to do your bit, and I felt bad.
  • I have to say that the worst offenders of being a ruckus backstage were the ladies in the formation number. All of them were full of nervous energy before taking stage to do their performance, so they were really chatty, and they kept walking through their routine while counting loudly. After they finished performing, they came back to the green room and kept talking about how awesome they had done very loudly.
  • Neither the blocking rehearsal nor the dress rehearsal had been done with the black curtain up that was used to surround the stage and hide the backstage area. On the back of the black curtain, the entrance had been marked with a big ‘X’ in masking tape, but there was nothing on the front side that showed which curtain was the one you should go through. Saturday night, a number of performers exiting the stage (including myself and Sparkledancer) chose the wrong curtain to exit through. Because the curtains were all pinned together and tied to the posts, if you chose the wrong curtain you ended up breaking something or you got stuck trying to create an opening to go through. That probably looked really bad.

Sunday night came around and we got a chance to do it all over again. The night went a lot better. Everyone seemed much more relaxed that night, which I think really helped. Perhaps going through the show on Saturday night helped relieve everyone’s nerves? The crowd also seemed much more responsive to all the jokes and to what the dancers were doing, and that definitely made the performance more entertaining. I think that the Fancy Dance Hall is planning to give all the performers a DVD of the show, and I’m secretly hoping that they recorded Sunday night’s performance to create the video off of.

I did create one issue for myself on Sunday that I’m not entirely proud of, even though everything worked out in the end. I swear that people were saying on Saturday that Sunday’s performance started an hour earlier, so I had planned out my whole day around showing up an hour before the show started so that I could warm up and be ready to go. What I didn’t know was that the show actually started two hours earlier than Saturday’s show… when I walked through the door of the Fancy Dance Hall an hour before what I thought was the start time, the audience was already all seated and waiting for the show to start!

Luckily, I had some time before I was to get on stage, and I didn’t really miss anything. They were running a few minutes behind, trying to find more seats for the over-capacity crowd that had bought tickets to the performance. Sir Steven and Sparkledancer gave me relieved looks when they saw me stretching out my shoulders backstage since I was finally there. I guess next time I should make sure to check the official documentation to learn the start times rather than rely on hearsay.

To avoid dealing with the noise issues of the previous night in the green room, I spent most of the night when I wasn’t on stage plopped down against a wall behind the curtain that surrounded the stage area rather than in the green room. This also let me sort-of watch the performance as it went on. With the lighting being used to illuminate the dancers, I could (mostly) make out what was happening through the black curtain that separated the stage from the backstage area.

A lot of people could see me sitting there as they made their way to enter or exit the stage for their routines, so eventually more and more people also decided to hang out in the backstage area where I was rather than going to the green room. I eventually lost my view of the stage because these other people began standing right up against the curtain to peek through and watch, and I couldn’t see through their bodies. Oh well… I guess I’ll have to wait to get my copy of the show on video to actually see what everything looked like.

Everyone managed to make all their cues that night. I heard that those kids that had missed their entrance on Saturday night had gotten a stern talking to from their instructor about abandoning the show after missing their mark, so they were all extremely ready to get on stage Sunday night. They almost went out too early because they were so ready to go! Luckily one of the girls in the group held everyone else back until she heard the right cue, so they managed to be on time.

Near the end of the show, Sir Steven came out of the green room to hang out in the backstage area as well. He must have been feeling pretty good about how the show was proceeding that night, because he started to do something rather silly. Walking along behind the curtain, he stopped himself in front of where a few of us were sitting on the floor. Taking the hat that was a part of his costume off of his head, he stuck out one of his legs and placed the hat upon his foot. Waving his hands around dramatically for a moment, he then proceeded to kick the hat up into the air and attempted to catch it upon his head.

This maneuver did not go well in all his attempts. The hat went flying over his head and onto the floor behind him. Everyone watching tried to laugh as quietly as possible as the hat missed landing on his head over and over, since there was a performance going on only two dozen steps away from us. After the third time he launched the hat off of his foot and couldn’t get it to land where he wanted, he set the hat on his foot for one more go. Faking a wind up of his leg once, and then twice, he lowered his leg as if to launch the hat with even more power than he had before.

Just as he started to bring his leg up to kick the hat upward, he stopped his leg when it was parallel with the floor, and then reached out to grab the hat with his hands, rolled it down his arms and set it smoothly on his head. He then slid his fingers along the brim to look cool, smiled at all of us who were now gathered to watch this, and wandered off back toward the green room. Just as quickly as this backstage show had started, it was all over, and all of us sitting there were trying as hard as we could not to break out laughing too loud to be heard by the audience.
And that was the showcase! I will say that it was entertaining. As I’ve mentioned before, I never really felt a deep connection to the performance, so I mostly felt like an outsider observing the makings of this show from behind the scenes. That’s a weird way to feel since I was one of the acts in the show. Would I do another performance like this? There’s a chance that I could be convinced to do another in the future, but I can’t say that I will go out of my way to sign up for one. I guess it depends on what the theme of the show is. I won’t be signing up to do another show like this any time soon though. Maybe I will do one in 2019. Maybe,

Now that the show is done, it’s time to get back to my normal training for future competitions. I feel like a lot of my practice sessions the past couple of weeks weren’t as focused on my competition routines as I should have been. Though, I will only be able to get so much training in until after the new year – Sparkledancer told me that she is traveling after Christmas to visit family, so I won’t be able to practice with her until after she gets back. We did set aside some time this weekend to practice before she leaves, so I’ll have that time under my belt at least!

If It Looks Like This Then You’re Doing It Right

As I mentioned in my last post, last Thursday night I had to attend my first rehearsal for the upcoming showcase performance. This is a very different setup than any other showcase I’ve ever done. Because the show is designed as a continuous story, we had to actually walk through the show to make sure that everyone knew where there entrances and exits were going to be. Along with that, there was a stage manager on hand who was making notes on all the props that were needed for each scene, and how to get those items to the dancers before they had to have them.

This blocking rehearsal was… well, it was really chaotic. No one stepped forward to take charge and keep everyone on task, so oftentimes there were several different groups getting in each other’s way, and they were playing the soundtrack for the show really loudly, so you could barely hear the instructions and comments when the music was playing. I am slated to be in a couple of scenes in the first act, so I was hanging around in the back watching everything until I needed to be onstage. As I watched, I couldn’t really make out what was supposed to be going on in the scenes they were trying to put together… and that’s bad because I know the story that this production is based on!

Sparkledancer and I are entering the set during a scene where there is a party going on in the background behind the main cast. We’re supposed to act like party goers, being happy and excited, and then we were told to freeze for the rest of the main cast’s scene. At a point in the dialogue, the lead male makes a reference to me, and that’s the cue for Sparkledancer and I to start moving and make our way to our starting position. When our song starts, we dance. After we finish up, we exit toward stage right and the lights will shift back to the main cast.

We were then told the part that we will play in the next scene. This one has no dancing for me, just acting. Sparkledancer and I are supposed to act like there has been some kind of fight, and she yells at me (silently) and storms off the stage toward stage left. I am supposed to be sad and dejected, and sit myself down on a bench in the back of the set, next to the lead male. He and I share an understanding look, another dance number takes place in front of us, and then I exit through the curtains in the back when the lights go down enough for me to sneak off.

Sounds pretty simple, right? Those were all the notes that I took about what needed to happen. We were told before the walk-through started that we could step through our dances as the music played, but we weren’t really practicing, so we didn’t have to dance full-on that night. I didn’t even change out of my sneakers, so I faked a lot of the dance just to make sure I could hit the points on the floor I needed with the set props in place. The few times I tried to turn that night were not pretty, because my sneakers have rubber soles and they stuck to the wood floor pretty solidly.

As I found out later though, I should have done more than fake it that night, because unbeknownst to me, there was a big problem that the music editor had created that I didn’t find out about until Saturday morning…

I met up with Sir Steven and Sparkledancer on Saturday to look at our showcase routine. We started of discussing the things that we were told during the blocking rehearsal, to make sure that everything was clear for all three of us. Everyone seemed to be on the same page as we started, so with all of those notes in mind, we got started dancing through the routine to look at everything critically and clean up anything that was out of sorts.

Because there were so many other people at the Fancy Dance Hall that day who were also preparing for the upcoming showcase, we didn’t get a chance to try anything out using the music the first half-dozen times that we danced through things. The routine went fairly well, all things considered – I had to fudge the angles a bit to avoid running into other people on the floor, but people were nice enough to get out of my way as soon as I picked Sparkledancer up off the ground and started moving.

We went through the lift at the end several times to make some adjustments to the final piece of it. Once I bring Sparkledancer down from over my head, I was supposed to get her to be in front of my chest and then curl her like a barbell. Sir Steven was trying to get her to keep her core more solid while I did that, because initially she was mostly relaxed and he thought it looked funny. This was really the only issue that he found with the ending, and as it turns out, it would be totally irrelevant by the end of our lesson.

Finally, with only a little time left before Sir Steven’s next lesson, we got a chance to try out our performance with the music. The main computer in the Fancy Dance Hall had a copy of the soundtrack that was cut together for the show, so Sir Steven picked through the music file until he found the beginning of our number. We practiced the entrance piece, hitting the cues for all our marks, and then got all the way to the end… and then the dialogue that was recorded in the soundtrack kicked in before we finished our lift and did the ending piece that was a huge part of the story!

Thinking there might have been a fluke, we tried it again, and got the same result. Sir Steven had told the person splicing the music together that we would be doing the lift at the end without following the timing of the music, but didn’t tell them how much time to give us to get through everything. After timing everything out based on the way the music is cut, our piece is roughly 1:35. When we practiced everything from the start of our dance until the ending that comes after the lift finishes, we were running right around 2:00. So now we had to eliminate twenty-five seconds of what we had practiced to make everything fit..

There were a couple of parts that Sir Steven told us to try to speed up, and he said to just get rid of the part of the lift where I curl Sparkledancer in front of my chest, but even without those pieces we are still over the amount of time we have in the soundtrack. To make matters worse, we had to stop there for the day since Sparkledancer and I had a coaching session with Lord Dormamu immediately following our lesson with Sir Steven. We all planned on meeting up on Wednesday evening to go over things and try to get the timing issue worked out before Thursday night’s dress rehearsal.

Sparkledancer and I got a few minutes to compare notes as Lord Dormamu finished up the lesson he was teaching before we dove into things. The first order of business that Lord Dormamu brought up was the coaching that we had gone through last Wednesday. The discussion that we had about everything that transpired was probably the most interesting and enlightening thing that I went through on Saturday.

I brought up several points that had been discussed with this coach that were either in direct conflict with things that Lord Dormamu had told me to be doing, or just seemed questionable based on what we were working on currently. Most of what we discussed related to the Tango, since that is what Sparkledancer and I are currently working on with Lord Dormamu. I told Lord Dormamu that we looked at Tango during the coaching session because we got through Waltz and Foxtrot rather quickly, and he was both surprised and pleased that the coach didn’t have much to say about our Foxtrot. I guess normally that style is one that coaches pick apart quite a bit, especially for dancers who are dancing syllabus routines.

The first thing that we discussed was the coach’s advice for Tango that Sparkledancer and I come up more in our frame rather than be so low to the ground that our knees get into each other’s way. I also told him about how the coach told me specifically that I should be leading my partner to rotate to Promenade Position with my hip in Tango, but if I were to get into frame the way Lord Dormamu wanted me to, there was really no way that my right hip could make contact with Sparkledancer at all.

Lord Dormamu’s answer to me was that this coach, like many others that I will end up meeting in my future dance journey, learned to dance (and became dance champions) a long time ago. The way that they learned to dance many figures is not the way that those figures are done any longer. When they judge dancers in Tango for instance, the way that Lord Dormamu is teaching me to do things is the way that will look the best to them and be scored the highest… but those same judges will not know how to teach someone to dance like that since they no longer compete, so they will just fall back to teaching things the way they learned to dance long ago.

And apparently this is normal and expected when any high level dancer works with one of these older judges. The coaching session that Lord Dormamu insisted that we take with this gentleman was mostly to get him to meet us and have some experience with how we dance. In the future, if this coach is judging a competition that Sparkledancer and I are competing in, he will likely remember more about how we danced during the coaching session that we had with him than he will about the few seconds that he sees of us on a competition floor, and his judging will reflect that. That is the real reason that Lord Dormamu wants us to work with some of these judges when they are available in our area.

Some of the advice that the coach gave us, like the concept of using my arms to lead while I dance, is apparently ideas that Lord Dormamu and I will work on in the future. They are concepts that are important, but not important for the level that I am currently competing in right now. Lord Dormamu’s plan, as I officially found out, is to keep Sparkledancer and I dancing in Bronze for another year as he finishes cleaning up all of our dances, and then start us on the track to move up the ranks.

If we have done everything correctly, according to him it shouldn’t take long for us to compete and win significant competitions in Silver and Gold, and he’ll get us to started working on Open-level routines before long. These advanced concepts that the coach mentioned, like leading with the arms and relaxing the position of my shoulders somewhat, will be incorporated into my dancing along the way. But not now, so I shouldn’t spend too much time thinking about them.

That was the first time that I had ever really heard Lord Dormamu verbalize my long-term dance plan. I guess he thinks that I am doing well enough to meet these objectives. Yay me!

Also on Saturday, I went out to what I think is going to be the only holiday dance party that I attend this year. Seeing as how my next weekend is dedicated to performing in a showcase, and the weekend after that I will have family holiday events to attend, there’s a good chance that the next dance party I go to will have to be New Year’s Eve. So I made time to go to this semi-formal affair being held at the Endless Dance Hall, which included dinner and some entertainment along with a chance to dance the night away.

The dinner was a buffet-style meal that they actually served in two different rooms. One room was opened up as soon as guests started arriving, and had a couple of tables full of appetizers that people could stop by and pick at. Then the second room opened and dinner was served. This meal seemed to mostly contain dishes that were made by the event organizers, which gave it a warm, personal feeling as opposed to a catered meal. As people were making their way through the line to get dinner, the first room that had the appetizers had a couple more tables full of desserts added to the mix, just in case you weren’t completely full from eating the other courses.

Once everyone had gotten something to eat and made their way to a table to sit down, the organizers brought out two dancers that are members of one of the local youth dance troupes to perform. I recognized the two of them, and also the routines that they were dancing, because they practice with their instructor at the Fancy Dance Hall on Saturdays during the time that I am normally there for my own lessons, so that was entertaining. They performed a Waltz number and a Cha-Cha, with a short break in between so that they could change costumes.

After the performances and dinner finished up, the DJ started to play music so that everyone else could dance. But more interesting than the dancing was getting a chance to see what all the attendees were wearing to the dance party. Several people who were at the table I was sitting at were pointing out various people on the dance floor, and it turned out to be a really fun game to see who had the best outfit on to show off their holiday spirit.

I think that the winner ended up being, hands down, the gentleman who wore a metallic silver outfit. Everything was metallic and silver, even his dance shoes! He looked kind of like he had just arrived from outer space! Personally I think that the runner-up was the gentleman who was wearing a tuxedo with a cumberbund and bow tie that were pastel orange in color. On a dance floor full of people sporting holiday colors, the pastel orange really stuck out and made him… unique. Close to that would have had to be the lady who was wearing an ugly Christmas sweater and a string of battery-powered Christmas lights in her hair. C’est magnifique!

Wednesday night had more than usual going on for me this week. I for one am looking forward to being done with the showcase after this weekend, so that my weeks can get back to some degree of normality. Skipping my nightly workouts for all this extra dance practice is really throwing me for a loop!

Sir Steven had agreed to meet up with Sparkledancer and I at the Electric Dance Hall the hour before Standard Technique class to go over our showcase routine. We talked about how the music was cut so short for our performance, and what we could eliminate in order to give us enough time to cover the key elements before we had to get off stage for the next dancers. Unfortunately, everything that got changed involved the lift at the end, which is the only part of the whole routine that I actually felt excited about doing.

Now what we have is a lift that moves very quickly – almost recklessly – from start to finish. I roll her out, I hold until the end of the measure as she gets into place, and then I head over to her. Crouching down, Sparkledancer hops up to sit on my shoulder, I stand up and rotate myself to take position back toward the center of the stage a bit. Instead of rotating several times, I am now only rotating one and a quarter turns to save time. Once I am facing the audience, I reposition my hands to lift Sparkledancer up over my head, and then I immediately bring her down in front of me, and then I rotate back the way I came to roll her out for the finish.

All the other pieces that used to be in the lift, including the dramatic effect of doing the whole thing slowly in front of the audience, have been removed. There’s no time any more. We have just barely enough time now for Sparkledancer to walk away from me and then for us to do the final piece of acting to connect our dance to the larger story of the show before the dialogue kicks in and the lights will shift to the next set of performers.

The way that this show turned out… I don’t know if I really feel like it is worth the amount of money I paid to be a part of the show. I guess I was hoping for something… more. I still feel really disconnected from the whole performance, and it’s only a few days away! There’s a good chance that it would take a whole lot of convincing to get me to agree to do another one of these staged showcases in the future.

Once Sparkledancer and I finished up with Sir Steven, we ran over to the other side of the dance floor to join Lord Junior for Standard Technique class. The class felt nice and relaxed that night, which was nice since I have been feeling a bit frazzled lately trying to get everything else done as the holidays approach.

Lord Junior and one of his high-level students had met up with the same coach that Sparkledancer and I had taken that lessons from last week, so we started off class with him and I sharing some of the pointers that we had each talked about with the coach. One of the things that the coach had specifically pointed out about how Lord Junior dances was the positioning of his right arm. He and the coach had talked about how many people have trouble keeping that arm in the right position.

We worked on a figure in Foxtrot that allowed him and I to focus on keeping our arms in the right place. The figure was an Open-level figure called Three Fallaways. My footwork for the figure basically had me doing the first half of an Open Reverse Turn, but then had me do the lady’s part for the second half instead of my normal footwork. Once I crossed my right foot behind my left, I repeated the first part of my footwork again, and then ended the figure with a basic Feather Ending. Seems pretty simple, right?

Broken down like that, the figure is fairly simple and is something that could be lead, but it moved quickly and covered quite a bit of distance down the floor, so you have to be aware of what’s going on before you start. After practicing the figure alone with each lady in class several times, we added on a figure to lead into the Three Fallaways. Lord Junior had us start out with an Open Impetus and Feather Finish. Starting right on an Open Impetus is a bit tricky, but we managed to get through with minimal difficulty.

Dress rehearsal for the showcase was tonight, and the performances are this weekend. It will be nice to finally put this behind me and get back to my normal training for a while. I also have a coaching session with Lord Dormamu on Saturday, so my weekend already feels super busy. Are you going to come watch the show? I’ll try my best not to disappoint if you’re in the audience!

You Put Your Arms Around Me And I’m Home

I had thought that my life would relax a little as the holidays drew closer. It seems like I was totally wrong in that assumption…

When I got together with Sir Steven and Sparkledancer on Saturday morning, everything seemed to have finally fallen into place. Sparkledancer and I had been given the entire choreography for our showcase less than a week beforehand, and had only managed to meet up for an hour on the Thursday evening beforehand to run through the sequence to try to memorize everything, but we managed to get it all down. It helped that I had gotten a video of Sparkledancer and Sir Steven dancing through the routine from start to finish the night we got the routine. I watched that over and over again, which helped me know which figures I needed to lead in the right order. Hooray!

I also think that I have my costume done. To keep things rather simple and inexpensive, large chunks of what I am wearing are items that I already had at home. For instance, I am just planning on wearing a pair of my dance practice pants during the performance. The look I was told to go for was semi-formal, but I need to have full range of motion for my legs to be able to squat down far enough so that Sparkledancer can hop up on my shoulder. Normal dress slack have the right look, but are too stiff for me to bend down like that. My dance practice slacks do flex in that manner, so they are a great choice.

Also, I actually saw the Artistic Director at the Fancy Dance Hall this weekend! We didn’t really get a chance to talk much though… she came walking through right at the end as we were finishing up our lesson. Sir Steven had her stop to take a look at what the lift which ends our performance, to help her figure out how to cut the music and give us enough time to draw the lift out dramatically. I wanted to ask her about all kinds of things related to the acting pieces that I’m going to have to do, but I was told that those questions would be answered during the blocking rehearsal that was scheduled for Thursday night.

So much for getting any time to practice that part of the show…

All that remains now is to continue practicing the routine to make sure it is comfortable and hits the few marks on the floor that I have. The performances are a little over a week away now. I am feeling pretty good about how things are going, but I’ll admit that I still feel no attachment to this performance. I guess that it’s good that I’ll be portraying a specific character, rather than trying to play myself while dancing. Having to give up all my ideas for this performance really disconnected me from the dance, and I don’t think anything is going to change in that regard between now and the first performance date.

I also managed to make it out to the Waltz workshop that was being held at the Electric Dance Hall on Saturday afternoon. This workshop was being put on by Lady Lovelylocks, who is Lord Junior’s professional partner. Lord Junior was also there milling about in the back of the studio, practicing some choreography from the looks of things. He jumped in near the end of the workshop when we started dancing with partners. There were quite a bit more women than men, so it was nice of him to help even out the ratio a little bit.

It felt like we spent most of the workshop on just stretching. Lady Lovelylocks wanted us to all get warmed up and work on using all the various parts of our bodies isometrically, so she showed us all sorts of different stretches to help with that. First we did all the stretches slowly, so that everyone could learn what they were supposed to do. Next she put them into a pattern so that we could all do them in the same order with some rhythm. Finally, we did the pattern with some Waltz music playing. That sequence lasted for multiple songs.

When we were finally all super warm, Lady Lovelylocks got down to business and had us focus on our rise and fall. To do this, we started with normal rotating box steps on our own. The points we were given to work on while doing these box steps were to make sure that we kept things slow and use all of the music, and to make sure that we didn’t come crashing down from our rise on beat three. I had somehow gotten stuck in the middle of the floor with people all around me that took tiny steps, so I felt like my box steps didn’t move a whole lot while I was practicing them.

There was only a little choreography used at the end of class that we danced with a partner. We looked at some Open Natural and Open Reverse Turns in Shadow Position, and the Change Step to switch between the two. I think I’ve mentioned this before at some point, but the Change Steps that you do while in Shadow Position are actually just three steps forward or backward.

These are not like a Three Step in Foxtrot, however. Lord Junior yelled at me from across the room because he saw me at one point doing my footwork like a Foxtrot Three Step. I didn’t even realize that I had done it until he said something, so it was totally my fault. Slightly embarrassing! The footwork should be like a normal Waltz Change Step, so make sure not to do a heel lead on the second step, or else you’ll get yelled at like I did…

The remainder of the class was spent switching through partners and dancing through these figures. We started off in Shadow Position already and did two Open Reverse Turns, then a Change Step followed by two Open Natural Turns, and we could finish with another Change Step if we had the room before we hit the wall. As the ladies were asked to rotate through the guys to practice, I seemed to be forgotten quite a bit. I was in the front of the room, because I didn’t want to get stuck behind anyone while I was traveling down the floor. When we all lined up on one end of the room and the ladies paired off with a guy, I was constantly having to wave my arms at them to have a lady come dance with me. Were they afraid of me or something?

Last Monday night at Latin Technique class I got to work on Rumba. We started off the class by warming up using Lord Junior’s new favorite Rumba exercise that involves doing Three Step Turns from side-to-side. Once we had gone through that enough times to make him happy, he had us do some work looking at basic Rumba walks. We used four types of Rumba Walks to start with, which were: the Forward Walk, the Checked Walk (which is what everyone does when they do the basic Rumba movement), the Turning Walk (which has you take a step forward and then turn 180° without moving your feet), and finally the Backward Walk.

Lord Junior wanted to build us a sequence of figures that night that focused on all of these walking movements, plus the Delayed Walk, which is basically just a normal walk but with some different (i.e. ‘delayed’) timing. We started things off facing our partner with our weight on the left leg and our right leg pointed back, ladies on their right leg with the left pointed forward. Our starter step was a step forward on beat four. Next we did a delayed Check forward, holding the check until just before the next beat four, when the ladies then would step toward us while the men just switched their weight to the right leg and pointed the left behind them.

Next we wanted to get the ladies out to Fan Position, so the men would lunge off to the left while twisting their upper bodies to press forward with the left arm, which would lead the ladies to collect and turn 90° clockwise, and then the men did a chasse to the right as the ladies did a Turning Walk to get into Fan Position. To give the ladies even more practice with their Turning Walks, we next led the ladies to do an Alemana. The men would shift slightly to the left as the ladies did this so that we could close with the ladies on our right side.

The last thing that we did was to lead the ladies through Opening Outs. Making things more difficult, Lord Junior asked the ladies to do these using the Delayed Walk action, where after doing the rock step backward, they would point their leg forward without moving until the absolute last second, and then step and turn to go into an Opening Out on the other side.

This was probably the most difficult thing we did that night. As a guy, you had to be careful not to push the lady forward too much after letting her open out. It had to be a balance of pushing enough so she came forward to get on her leg and point her other toe, but not enough to actually step forward through both legs. We did two Opening Outs with this delayed action, and then a third where we brought the lady forward as normal and then led her into a Spiral Turn before sending her back out into Fan Position.

The last thing that I want to talk about this week was the coaching that I got signed up for last night. Lord Dormamu had a good friend of his, who much like Lord Dormamu is also a world-famous International Standard coach that many of you have probably heard of, in town on Wednesday. They were meeting up to discuss some business propositions about putting together a new competition in the Dance Kingdom. I’m sure this means that Lord Dormamu will tell me that I’m going to be competing in this event when they get it all up and running.

Since there was some extra time in the schedule between and after their business discussions, this gentleman offered to hold some coaching sessions for any students that were interested, and Lord Dormamu signed Sparkledancer and I up. Because I had things going on at work yesterday, I could only get to the Fancy Dance Hall late in the evening, so I ended up getting the coach’s last time slot of the day. In a way this worked out very nicely because there was no rush for us to complete our session so that he could move on to other students after us. Our lesson went waaaaay over the time it should have as we looked over all sorts of material together.

Once Lord Dormamu introduced us, he asked that we spend our time having the coach look over our Waltz and Foxtrot. With those marching orders, we got started, though we didn’t stick to the script we were given for the entire session. The lesson basically went like this: the coach had us dance through our routines once for him with music, and when we finished up we would talk about what he saw us doing through his adjudicator eyes. Throughout the night we were given specific notes about each dance style we completed, and by the end of the session I also had several overall takeaways that covered all dance styles universally that he wanted me to think about.

Let me start with the notes on the individual dance styles. Though we were told by Lord Dormamu to work on Waltz and Foxtrot, apparently our Foxtrot was pretty good so we didn’t spend much time going over it, and had time left over to look at Tango as well. Sparkledancer chose to start with the Waltz, so that’s what we received notes on first.

There were really only a couple of things specific to the Waltz that he picked on, and some of these may just be his particular preferences when he judges competitions. These were his notes:

  • He wanted to see us doing more distinct rise and fall during the Progressive Chasses throughout the routine. As we tried it out, I thought that it felt overdone, but he said that it looked better from where he was standing.
  • Next up, he thought that I was taking far too small of a step going into the Double Reverse Spins. I asked him about how I’d always been told to take small steps with early quick rise to lead a Double Reverse Spin, and he said that by the book that’s what I should do, but it looked like I wasn’t traveling anywhere on my first step when I did that.
  • The final thing he wanted to talk about was when going into the Whisk, it didn’t look to him like I was taking a complete step onto my left foot before rising up and taking a step to the side and slightly back onto my right foot. To make sure it looked the way it should, he wanted me to take the first step and have all of my weight over my left leg (almost to the point where I could stand on one foot) before moving to my right leg.

Foxtrot was definitely where I felt the strongest that night, and there were only a couple of items that he said looked out-of-place in his eyes (the last one is definitely a personal preference of his, since I have been specifically told by Lord Dormamu to do it differently):

  • I was told to put more emphasis on moving slower during the slow steps. He wanted me to really extend my legs and push myself as far as possible during those two beats before putting my foot down and going into the quick steps. It wasn’t that I was rushing when I danced it as he watched, he said, but I wasn’t using my timing to its full potential.
  • There were a few points, like on the first Feather in the routine, where he said that it seemed like I was rotating too much and Sparkledancer was ending up beside me rather than in front of me. He wanted me to lessen the rotation through my body to avoid that, and instead change the placement of where my steps were going to help keep her in front. If I feel like she is ending up beside me on my right instead of in front of me, I need to take my step slightly more to the left to compensate.
  • During the Weaves that we do, he wanted me to add shaping through the progression. On the Natural Weave for instance, Lord Dormamu has always told me that I would be shaping with the left side through the Natural Turn, then level out through the actual Weave, and then shape to the left again through the Feather Finish. The coach wanted me to shape to the right through the Weave to emphasize the difference in those steps. This I think may just be a personal preference thing, so I’ll run this item by Lord Dormamu before I work on adding it into my practice.

With some time left, the coach wanted to keep going and switch over to the Tango. Before we got started, Sparkledancer and I warned him that our Tango was still a work in progress, and it was what we considered the weakest of our dances. After we finished dancing through the routine once, he stopped us and said that he thought our Tango actually looked fairly good, which was nice to hear. There were a few points that we managed to talk about that he suggested we change:

  • He thought that we were too low in our Tango frame, which he said explained why we always had to air close our feet because our partner’s knee was between our own. I was told to bring my legs together and stand with Sparkledancer in front of me, with her legs also together. We then bent at the knees until we met resistance from each other’s legs. That was as far down he said we should be while dancing.
  • The coach specifically mentioned leading my partner to roll into Promenade Position through rolling my right hip forward slightly. This goes directly against what Lord Dormamu said last time we got together when he told me to stop doing exactly that. What…??? This is definitely something that I am going to have to discuss with Lord Dormamu.
  • We spent a bit of time looking at the Right Lunge in the corner. He wanted me to adjust the rotation in my upper body so that as my legs are lunging toward diagonal wall, my upper body is pointing more line of dance, and thus is pushing Sparkledancer to shape out more line of dance with her upper body as well.
  • Much like with the Foxtrot steps, he wanted me to make sure to slow down when bringing my feet together at the end of a figure. Usually the close happens over two beats in the music, but I am closing my feet immediately and then just hanging out. He prefers that I hang out with my legs still in their previous position and my body split-weight between them, and then close my feet at the end of the two beats.

There were some additional comments he made about our overall dancing as competitors that he’d like to see us work on. One note he told each of us was based on our positioning when dancing together. He told me that I needed to watch my right elbow, to make sure that I was not pulling it back too far. I was told to think about when dancing with a partner that there is essentially one-and-a-half people for my arms to get around. There’s the front half of my body, and then my partner’s body. To ensure that my right arm is capable of covering this distance, my arm needs to be bent enough so that my elbow is out in front of the front half of my body. I had never heard it described like that before, and I thought that was an interesting way of looking at things.

Sparkledancer was told that her upper body needs to lean on an angle more to the left. She has been working a lot lately on bending herself back to create more volume, but not as much on leaning herself to the left side at the same time. Leaning in this direction essentially presses her left lat muscle into my right hand as we stand in frame. This will probably be something that we will have to focus specifically on during practice, to move while having her lean to the left while bending backward instead of just one direction at a time.

The last thing that we talked about last night went off on a weird tangent that I had never heard anyone talk about before. It came up while we were looking at the Right Lunge in the Tango. At one point he wanted me to lead him through the figure. When I got into frame with him, he said that I was not holding him tightly enough with my right hand. Afterward, when I got back into frame with Sparkledancer, he said that I was also not holding her tightly enough as well. What gives?

He told us a story about how he once had a coach work with him back when he was competing. This coach wanted to have him demonstrate a figure with her, so she asked him to lead her through it and got into frame with her with a considerable gap between their bodies. This made him uncomfortable, as he had been told over and over again that the lead should come through his body, so having to lead her through the figure without body contact felt wrong to him. Then she asked him: why should it be a problem?

This coach explained to him that we need to use our arms to lead our partners properly, even in International Standard. They are an important tool that should be used to communicate with our partner. People who dance American Smooth have to lead like this all the time, because many of their figures obviously break body contact. Why should people who dance International Standard handicap themselves by trying to only lead with the body, she asked him. The trick is to learn to lead with your arms correctly, so that you can do it without your partner complaining that it feels like you are pushing and pulling her all over the place.

His suggestion for me was to get into the habit of having a more firm hold on any partner that I danced with. This would allow them to clearly feel what my right arm is doing around their back, and take away any confusion that could arise from the leads with my body. While I should be leading my partner to turn to Promenade Position through a roll of the hip, for instance, I should also be pulling back slightly with my right arm to make the implication for her to turn to Promenade Position unmistakable.

Learning to lead like this will be challenging after being told for so long to lead solely through my body. Even the coach admitted that it took him quite a while to learn how to lead certain figures after his coach told him to start using his arms. He said that as he started to lead like this, whenever he had a partner complain that they felt like he was pulling or pushing them with his arms, he would take that as a sign that he was doing it wrong and then have to reevaluate what his arms were doing and try again.

That was quite an interesting concept to end the night with, and I have been thinking about it on and off ever since. I’m not sure what exactly I would have to change to use my arms more in this manner, but it might be helpful that I started out dancing doing only American Smooth, so maybe some of that training will be useful here? I guess I’ll have to talk it over with Sparkledancer the next time we meet up to practice to see what she thinks too. After all, this will probably affect her more than it affects me.

It’s been a long night. I had the blocking rehearsal for the showcase performance tonight, to get everything mapped out before dress rehearsal next Thursday. I haven’t really had time to process that yet, so maybe I will talk about it next time. I have another super busy week ahead of me with all sorts of dance-related activities, so I’m going to leave it here for now, take a deep breath, and get some rest before jumping into it. I hope your week is just as fun!