Said My Name Is Called Disturbance

A lot of the people I know in my neck of the woods were off at some big Pro/Am competition last Saturday, so my weekend got a bit switched around. All of the dance-related things that I normally do on Saturdays had to be done on Sunday, so all of the dance-related things that I would have otherwise done on Sunday I did on Saturday instead. By the time I was heading off to bed on Sunday night, I had to remind myself a couple of times to set my alarm to get up for work the next morning, because I was feeling a bit mixed up trying to remember what day it was.

On Sunday I had planned to meet up with Sparkledancer and Lady Tella so that the girls could continue to work on improving how Sparkledancer looks while in dance position. Much of our practice time over the prior week had been devoted to working on the Waltz, so Sparkledancer asked Lady Tella if she could start off looking at that style with us. Near the end Sparkledancer and Lady Tella switched over to looking at the Tango for a little while, since that style has positioning for the lady that is so different from every other style. Most everything that was talked about during this session didn’t really impact me, but there was one particular note that Lady Tella gave to me that I have two minds about, so I’ve been trying to digest what to do with the information since Sunday.

Lady Tella told me that while my posture is good and I am obviously much bigger than most male ballroom dancers, my presence on the floor needs to change slightly. She used the words “arrogant” and “haughty” to describe the look that she wanted to see me going for. I guess that in her experience being around male dancers in the Professional circuit where she competes with her partner, the really good men all strut around like peacocks with too many feathers up their backsides… or like nobility that is looking down on the peons. I do not look like that normally, as you can hopefully imagine, so she wants me to try to incorporate that into my presence while I am dancing.

This bothers me a little. I guess on one hand I can understand why really high level dancers would want to pass themselves off in this way. For one thing, that is essentially the mental picture that most people have in the back of their minds of ballroom dances: the suave prince who is hosting a ball, and waltzing around the floor with a princess. In that scene, of course the guy is going to hold himself above all the others. He’s the frickin’ prince, so the peons (historically speaking, of course) are actually below him. For another thing, wandering around looking like this for most guys will make them look even stronger and more confident, like they are definitely the ones in control of the situation. During a competition, looking like you ‘own’ the place can be very advantageous.

Even though I can understand this in that sense, I have to say that it feels wrong to me to try to dance while in that mindset. I don’t like even pretending to be haughty or arrogant. Trying to be arrogant does not feel natural to me, and I can’t say that I particularly enjoy being in that sort of mindset, even if it’s just for a performance. That’s not how I was raised, and part of me thinks that my mother would smack me upside the head if she ever caught me looking like that. I much prefer to be charismatic, approachable, happy, and maybe even a little funny if I can pull it off while I’m dancing.

The bigger question that this raises for me is… why have high level male competitors over the years decided that this is the best way to portray themselves anyway?

When I think about going out and being a dance ambassador, trying to convince people to try out ballroom dancing for themselves, I can’t say that being arrogant or haughty would pass off as an enticing selling point to people who have never set foot in this world before. If anything, I think that me looking arrogant would actually dissuade people from wanting to come out and dance with me. So why in the world would I want to act that way during a competition? Since competitions seem to be the only part of this sport that is ever broadcast on television, do you think that someone tuning in and watching a bunch of haughty-looking men out on the dance floor would suddenly think to themselves ‘Huh, that definitely looks like something I want to try. Where do I sign up?’

Somewhere along the way the idea of ballroom dancing seems to have gotten twisted. Instead of being a social activity that we can all go out and do for either fun or sport (or both), it’s turned into this world where you have to look and act a certain way to fit in and do well: old men complain about people who show up at social dances wearing jeans; during competitions, it is entirely possible for a couple to be judged based on appearance rather than purely on skill; knowing the right people can help you advance further – and usually ‘knowing’ people involves spending money to take lessons from or go to events hosted by said people. All of this adds up to make the world of ballroom dancing appear to be a world where only those well-to-do enough hang out, and people of lesser means get scared away before their own adventures in dancing even get started.

So what is a poor boy like me to do? I mean, aside from singing for a rock ‘n’ roll band, of course. Do I take the advice of this young lady who I was working with on Sunday and pretend to be more haughty and arrogant when I am out on the dance floor competing, because that is what the recommended look is? Since I can’t really watch myself very well while I dance, and videos I take really only show me a limited amount once I move away from them, I can’t tell with my own eyes if the act I would be putting on really does make me look better while dancing. Or do I fight against that notion and be more like my normal persona? If I can prove to others that I can do well while appearing to be charismatic and approachable, perhaps I can use that as a selling point to others who have never danced before and say ‘hey, if I can do this, you could totally do it too!’

I don’t have an answer at the moment. I think I’m going to have to noodle on this a bit more before I can figure out what the best answer for me actually is.

*    *    *

Well… that went off on a bit of a tangent, didn’t it?

In Latin Technique class this week we looked at some Cha-Cha. Lord Junior had been having a conversation with one of his more advanced students before class started about a particular concept in Cha-Cha, and being the nice guy that he is, he wanted to talk about the concept with the whole class once we got started. This was mostly something that would be useful to ladies, but Lord Junior said there were some specific places that men could use this trick as well, depending on the choreography that was being used.

The idea was this: in Cha-Cha, what you see high-level dancers doing nowadays is replacing spots where they would normally do a Turning Walk action with a Straight Leg Pivot. He demonstrated this using a fairly simple figure that most ladies have done before, which was the Hockey Stick. During a normal Hockey Stick, on step seven the ladies will do a Turning Forward Walk that rotates ⅜ of a turn to the right. Now picture this: on step seven when you step forward onto your straight right leg, you leave the left leg behind you and pivot for ⅜ of a turn on the right foot. When you finish the pivot, the left leg is already in the right position for your next step backward onto it with no additional leg action needed, speeding up the entire movement by a fraction.

What makes this simple-sounding concept more advanced than the Turning Walk action is that you have to do it well, so that it actually looks like you are doing a Straight Leg Pivot on purpose. If you don’t keep your leg lines crisp and the pivot precise, you run the risk of it looking like you just messed up while doing a Turning Walk and are just trying to fake something until you can get back into the correct choreography. If you want to do this substitution during a competition, make sure that you practice enough so that the change looks clean, otherwise a judge could fault you for it. Oh yeah, and avoid making this change until you hit Open-level choreography. If you try this in Syllabus rounds, you can get faulted for it, since the official syllabus figures are still written as Turning Walk actions.

To practice this action, we were given a short progression during class to work with that incorporated the example used in demonstration. We started right off with the ladies already out in Fan Position, closing them into a Hockey Stick while the guys did a Slip Chasse. After we finished the Forward Lock in the Hockey Stick, Lord Junior had us do something a bit silly to let the ladies also  work on their hip actions that night. The guys would step forward and point their opposite leg to the side for three steps while the ladies were doing Batucadas, an action you normally see in Samba. At the end of the three pointing steps, we did two quick steps forward to end up on our right leg (ladies on their left).

From here we did a normal checking action into a basic Backward Lock Step. To finish everything off, Lord Junior had the guys just transfer their weight onto their right leg to get close to the lady, which stopped her from moving any farther forward. She would then raise her right leg up while balancing on her left leg, putting her into a line that looked kind of like a flamingo to me. The guys then lunged out to our left side while twisting to give the lady more of our left arm, which would help her rotate her body a bit further while she was still up on one leg, before we led her across our body at the last moment for a three-step turning motion that put her back out into Fan Position. The guys could either do a small chasse to the right here, or if the lady didn’t travel all that far we could just step to the right and hold to make our own movement smaller.

Standard Technique class this week was a lot of fun. This was the first week in a really, really long time that there was no one else in the studio except for those of us who were there for Standard Technique class. I don’t mention it much (not really at all), and I don’t show it in pictures very often, but the Electric Dance Hall usually has tons of activity going on. I would make the argument that it’s the busiest dance studio within an hour drive of my house – and there are quite a few dance studios to choose from in that radius, so that’s really saying something. To have the whole floor free for a single group class was pretty awesome.

To capitalize on our good fortune, Lord Junior had us work on some Quickstep, and gave us what almost amounted to a full competition routine. Some of us were able to use the progression to easily cover three-quarters of the loop around the floor. He would have given us more, but we ran out of time just trying to practice what we had at the end of our time that night enough so that all the ladies could get through it well. I specifically say ladies here because there were five women in class, but only Lord Junior and I to dance with them, so he and I got to practice the figures quite a bit more than all of the ladies that night.

We started off in the corner of the long wall, facing diagonal center. After a prep step we went into two Forward Lock Steps that were in Pepperpot timing (for those of you who don’t know, “Pepperpot timing” is five steps done at a count of ‘quick-and-quick, quick, quick’). Depending on who you are dancing with, these two Forward Lock Steps can cover a significant amount of ground, so you may need to adjust your angle slightly to avoid crossing into traffic on the other side of the dance floor. Lucky for me that the dance floor was completely empty during class, right? After the two Forward Lock Steps, we went into a Quick Open Reverse followed immediately by a Four Quick Run, finishing with a basic Natural Turn. That chain of figures was enough to put us into the far corner on the first long wall.

To turn the corner we did a Running Natural Spin Turn and used that to go into a Backward Lock Step. How much the Running Spin Turn was actually turned really depended on how far down the floor you and your partner managed to get as you traveled down the long wall. If you ended up with some space between you and the wall, the Running Spin Turn should end with you backing diagonal wall on the short wall, and the Backward Lock Step will then follow that path. If you and your partner end the long wall right against the short wall, you have to underturn the Running Spin Turn and end backing line of dance, then take the Backward Lock Step that direction to avoid crashing into the wall.

Most of us were able to easily cover the entire length of the short wall with those two figures, so at the end of the Backward Lock Step we used a Running Finish and another Natural Turn to turn the second corner. At this point we did an Overturned Open Telemark, which I think was the hardest figure we did all night, since a Heel Turn is not something you can easily do in Quickstep at tempo. Coming out of the Overturned Open Telemark put us in Promenade Position facing line of dance. Here we did a step and hop action over the next two beats of music followed by a Promenade Chasse that was in Pepperpot timing, and then we repeated that amalgamation one more time. We ended the progression by just taking a few steps that ‘ran’ forward, using those to bleed off any momentum that we had left.

Have I mentioned that I’m doing another competition in a few weeks? I’m pretty sure it’s scheduled over the last weekend of this month, but I don’t have my calendar in front of me to confirm that for sure. I know I’ll be there for sure whatever date it actually is, since I already paid my entry fee and signed up for the rounds I wanted. Is it terrible that I can’t remember the exact date right now, and I really can’t bring myself to either get up and go look at my calendar, or open another tab in my browser to look up the information online? I am so lazy sometimes…

But that’s what all my practice work has been preparing for lately. Here’s hoping that the field of competitors at this event is pretty large and that I haven’t danced against most of them before in previous competitions. I feel like I would get a better read on how well I’m doing if I can face off against more people, rather than the same people over and over again.

We’ll start the countdown and see what happens soon!

Advertisements

Blind Labors The Blind And I Am Unwilling To Uncover My Eyes

Last Saturday many of the Professionals that work in the Dance Kingdom were off at some competition, so there was relatively little going on. All of the people I normally work with on Saturdays were there, so I had only one item on my schedule. Of course, that one thing was still enough to make me nervous, since I was planning to spend some time working with the Princess. As I mentioned last week, she was one of the judges for the last competition I participated in, and she offered to go over her thoughts on how Sparkledancer and I did with us. As it turned out, I didn’t need to be so nervous about meeting with her, since what she spent the majority of the time talking about was Sparkledancer. That didn’t mean that I got off scot-free that afternoon, just that most of the notes I made for our session don’t directly relate to me.

The Princess wanted to talk about our Waltz and Foxtrot, but since the ideas that she wanted to relay to us were the same for both dance styles we spent the entire time working on Waltz that day. She wanted to start us off just by getting us into frame for a few minutes so that she could talk about how we looked. There was praise for Sparkledancer on the changes that she has been making while working with Lady Tella – the Princess clearly sees that Sparkledancer is on the right track to be awesome. She recommended that when we take frame, Sparkledancer needs to get comfortable taking the position right away. I believe she described it as being “specific and deliberate” when we come together. Right now, since we have been making changes there are a few moments of minor adjustments being made before we begin.

She also wanted to see Sparkledancer be less centered on my body and even more offset to my right to start with, almost wrapping around my right hip. But not actually wrapping around my right hip, since she said that Sparkledancer’s right hip should be closing to me. To help with this, the Princess told me that I need to watch my own right elbow and make sure that it is coming forward in front of my body as I put my right arm around my partner. During the competition she said that it looked like my right elbow was in line with my chest, which tends to pull Sparkledancer toward me and kill the volume we are trying to create. If I had to guess why I was doing that, I think that I was trying so hard to pull my elbows apart and expand my chest to create more of a presence that it was moving my right arm into the wrong place in the process. Whoops.

Now that we were in a position that was to the Princess’ liking, we began moving while applying those notes. She started by just having me walk through the first couple of opening steps. I guess during the competition, there were a couple of times in some of the heats where she saw me ‘stutter’ (as she called it), and she wanted to see if I would do it again while she was specifically watching for it. Of course, at that point I didn’t, probably  because I was so worried about doing it again and embarrassing myself that I focused specifically on not doing anything weird, so she couldn’t help me figure out why I did it during the competition and fix it. Ah well, maybe next time…

Going into the Natural Turn next, she wanted to see me stay down lower through the first step of the figure and into the second step, only starting to rise as I actually take the second step. On top of that, she wanted to see Sparkledancer keep her chest more towards me and the upper part of her left shoulder out as we reach the highest rise in the Natural Turn. This should help create a better shape for that momentary hold we do before we begin to lower for the next figure.

Next up we have the Underturned Natural Spin Turn. During this figure, she told Sparkledancer to initiate the turn by keeping her right shoulder down and pulling her left elbow up and around. On top of that, the Princess told me to make the shaping more distinct by bringing my right side up further as we go through the turn, then to neutralize as we come out and swap into a left side sway as we go into the next Reverse Turn. The shaping was kind of there in the competition, but I need to work at it more to make sure that it looks like I am actually doing the sway on purpose.

From there, we talked about the Double Reverse Spin a little. The Princess recommended that Sparkledancer maintain the left position longer, and to make sure that her right hip doesn’t open away from me throughout the figure. That led us right into the Progressive Chasse to the Right, where Sparkledancer was asked to pull her left elbow further to the left, and also create more volume. While we are traveling straight down the line of dance in a Waltz, having more volume is even more important than it is during rotational figures, since the judges who are standing behind our line of travel can really evaluate how the volume looks.

The last two figures that we managed to get through was the Outside Change and the Chasse from Promenade Position. During the Outside Change, the Princess asked Sparkledancer to hold her position longer before the transition into Promenade Position. This was especially for the position of her head. Once she arrived in Promenade Position, Sparkledancer was told to maintain her pull to the left and slide her foot out, allowing her left foot to cross under her body before she closes back to normal dance frame.

As you can see, most of the notes that we talked about that day were for Sparkledancer, so hopefully they are helpful to other ladies out there. One point that I did take a few extra minutes after our lesson was over to ask the Princess about was the placement of my right hand. I noticed that whenever the Princess got into dance frame with me, she always slid herself up my right arm so that my fingertips were almost crossing over her spine to her right side. I didn’t know if this was because my arm was in a different position with her than it usually is with Sparkledancer (the Princess is several inches shorter) or if I was actually holding Sparkledancer wrong, so I thought I should just ask while she was standing next to me.

Turns out that I was doing it wrong, as you probably guessed. I was placing my hand on the back of Sparkledancer’s shoulder, which was forcing me to try to control her with the hand itself. If I allowed it to come around Sparkledancer more so that Sparkledancer’s actually pulling herself left into my wrist/forearm instead, then the control point becomes the lower half of my arm rather than my hand. Taking all of the extra joints out of the equation will (in theory) make maneuvering my partner easier. It will take a bit to get used to the different feeling on my arm until I am able to do that easily, but with time hopefully that turns out to be the case for me.

Last Sunday afternoon I had a lesson scheduled with Lord Dormamu, but he ended up having to stay at the competition he was at on Saturday for an extra day, so he wasn’t able to make it. Rather than leave Sparkledancer and I with extra time to practice, Lord Dormamu had talked to Lady Tella and convinced her to work with us (i.e. mostly with Sparkledancer) that afternoon instead.

While this was a nice thing for him to arrange for us, it was kind of a mean thing to ask Lady Tella to do. See, she had been competing on Saturday at the same competition that Lord Dormamu was attending. When she and her professional partner Lord Bread finished up at the competition, they had to drive all the way back home from the competition so that she could be here for our lesson. From what she told us, she had only gotten home around 05:00 that morning, then crashed for a few hours before getting up to come to the Endless Dance Hall and work with Sparkledancer and I. Poor girl!

The first thing that we talked about with Lady Tella was working with the Princess the day before so that she had a basic idea about what the Princess and Sparkledancer discussed. After that, much of the time was spent with Lady Tella and Sparkledancer working on her position as we moved around, mostly in Waltz but we switched over to a little Foxtrot near the end. I got even fewer notes for myself from what was talked about in this lesson than I got from the Princess. It’s all good though. Dancing International Standard requires two people, so I’m happy to let Sparkledancer be the focus of the attention for a change.

There was one interesting point that Lady Tella asked of me that I am trying to figure out how to work into what I do. At several specific points during the Waltz routine she started asking me to allow the figure to ‘breathe’ much like she has been asking of Sparkledancer. Obviously I can’t shape in nearly the same way that Sparkledancer can, or else I might break our connection and cause us to get into trouble, but she wanted to see me expand up and back just a little more to try to make a visible difference.

The two points where she really wanted me to do this noticeably during what we were working on last Sunday were during the two chasse figures along the long wall (Progressive Chasse to Right and the Chasse from Promenade Position), and the Hesitation Change in the first corner. During those figures she also wanted to see Sparkledancer try to open up more away from me, so having me also open slightly at the same time should give the illusion of us having much more volume during those moments. I’m sure there are other places that we will come across where the recommendation will be for Sparkledancer to try to create more volume, so I should watch for those points and see if it is also an appropriate spot for me to try to do the same. If there is a 1:1 correlation, then I can start adding my own action in without being asked.

And that was all the dancing I did this past weekend! Hooray to me for mixing things up a little! The next dance related thing that I got into was Latin Technique class on Monday night. Only a few of us managed to gather out at the Electric Dance Hall for class that night. Supposedly there was some big event that was happening in the area on Wednesday that several people who normally attend Latin Technique were out preparing for. I guess I didn’t get the memo on that.

But for those of us who were still dedicated, we got to work on some Samba that night. For a bit of warm-up, Lord Junior was just going to have us dance through the Samba Line Dance that is popular in this part of the Dance Kingdom, but one of the ladies in class told him that she had never done the Samba Line Dance before, so the first twenty minutes of class turned into a crash course on how to do the line dance, and then how to do a few variations on the normal figures of the line dance to make yourself look cooler than everyone else near you.

The normal version of the line dance that I learned long ago has you doing four repetitions of a bunch of figures. You start out with four of the Basic Movements, then go into four Whisks, then four Traveling Bota Fogos Forward, and then finally four curved Voltas to the right that allow you to change which direction you are facing, finishing with four Voltas to the left that do not curve. Once you finish the last Voltas and are facing the new wall, you start all over from the top. I’m sure you’ve probably seen all of these figures somewhere if you’ve ever done Samba before, so you could use this information to give things a try!

Once we finished up working on the Samba Line Dance, Lord Junior wanted to have us go through another figure that the high-level Latin coach he had come to the Electric Dance Hall a couple of weekends ago spent quite a bit of time working through with him: the Promenade and Counter Promenade Runs. One of the points that the coach gave to Lord Junior which he found very interesting was the way she preferred to hold her arm while in this figure. The big problem that a lot of people run into is trying to keep their body twisted enough so that their back leg still has the foot turned out when they land during the Promenade and Counter Promenade Runs. If you don’t get it right, you end up with your foot in the wrong position, which will get you marked down during a competition.

The coach recommended to Lord Junior that he change the way he held his arm so that it was out in front of him rather than opened up to the side. Holding your arm in this manner helps to counter balance you so that turning out your foot in the back is less awkward. This subtle change really does make a difference, as long as you remember to actually hold your arm forward instead of opening it out to your side. I will admit to forgetting to make the change a few times as we practiced the figures that night.

As for the actual figures that we did, Lord Junior had us start off with the guys standing on their left leg, right leg pointed behind them, and the ladies right in front of them holding our left hand with their weight on the right leg and the left one pointed forward. From there we went right into the Promenade and Counter Promenade runs, with the guys taking three steps forward to start while the ladies turned to open up out to our right side. We did two more rounds where first the guys crossed over, then the ladies, ending up with the guys on the left side once again. Next we did a Ronde Whisk, which is basically exactly like it sounds. As you take a side step to start the Whisk, you then rotate slightly and do a Ronde with your free leg until it crosses behind the other and then do the Samba bounce action.

We rotated ourselves 180 in the process of doing the Ronde Whisk, so now we were facing against line of dance. Next we led the lady to do a Three-Step Turn across our bodies as we shifted weight between our legs. Catching her arm left arm as she went by, we got her to strike a line to the right at the end as we lunged out to our left. After that we led her to do another Three-Step Turn back toward us while we just shifted weight again, finishing in Shadow Position. That’s where we stopped for the night since we ran out of time, but Lord Junior said he probably would have had us do some kind of Samba Roll action from there if we had had more time.

Next up, Standard Technique class on Wednesday night. The class ended up being about Waltz again, because Lord Junior had seen a video of a figure that he had never done before for Waltz that he wanted to try out with some students to see how it went. That figure happened to be the Chasse Roll to Left, which is an Open-level figure for those of you who may be interested in fitting it into your own body of knowledge. Lord Junior told us that he has used the Chasse Roll to Right lots of times in routines with his students, but he had just never considered seeing if a Left version existed before until he stumbled upon it this week.

Before we got into that though, Lord Junior had us all back doing the warm-up exercise that we had done last week, where you do box steps over a nine count. I don’t know why people think that this exercise is overly difficult. Sure, it will put pressure on your inner thigh muscles if you are pulling your legs together properly, but it’s not that bad. I don’t think so, at least. The balance component shouldn’t really be an issue either because of how slow we were moving, but surprisingly others in class were complaining about that too.

Driving home after class, I started thinking about exercises that people could do to improve on the things they complain about that I seem to find simple. Maybe I should start toying with the idea of putting together a three-month workout regimen designed for ballroom dancers – something to help dancers get in shape for these sorts of exercises. I wonder if I could hand it over to some Professionals to have their students do and report back on the results. Hmm… something to think about if I find some extra time. I have nothing but free time, right? It should be no problem for me to sit down and design and document something like that!

Anyway… once we were all warmed up, we were given a short progression of figures to work on. To get things rolling, we started off with a prep step into a Natural Turn, and then added on a basic Natural Spin Turn. Coming out of the Natural Spin Turn set us up for the figure that Lord Junior wanted to work on with us, the Chasse Roll to Left, which looks a lot like a Curved Chasse to the Left with a Slip Pivot at the end if you look it up for yourselves. Once we finished the Slip Pivot, we led the ladies into a Oversway.

One of the ladies asked a question about the Oversway, which got us talking about that for a few minutes. Many of us had done a Throwaway Oversway before, but here was just the Oversway without any of the Throwaway. I had to ask whether that meant that you could do just the Throwaway without any of the Oversway as well. Lord Junior had to stop and think about my question for a minute, and pretended to dance through it a few times. He told me that you could probably do it, and that it was likely some super-high level Professional couple probably has at some point, but he thinks it feels weird to do just the Throwaway without the Oversway so he personally wouldn’t recommend trying it.

To come out of the Oversway we went back to the warm-up exercise that we had done and slowly dragged our left foot to our right (or right to left for the ladies) over two beats while rising up and rotating into Promenade Position, taking our first side step in Promenade Position on beat three. From there, to show us the differences in the two figures, he also had us do a Chasse Roll to Right with a Oversway attached at the end. This figure confused me with its name a little, because the footwork we did for the Lead part was more like a Curved Lock instead of a Chasse, but the Follow’s part looked more like a Progressive Chasse to Right, so I guess that’s what makes it work.

Getting out of this Oversway involved taking a small step to the side with your left foot and rising up for two beats and then dropping the right foot behind you for a Slip Pivot on the third, and from there we went into a basic Progressive Chasse to Right to finish. You want to be careful when you take the side step as you close. If you come around the lady too much, she may think that you are doing a Corte-like action and rotate her body improperly, which could cause all sorts of fun problems. I may know this because I may have accidentally done it… maybe. I’m not admitting that it was entirely my fault, but I may have messed it up once or twice. May. In May. 😉

That’s all I have got for this week. This coming weekend I am not entirely sure what I will be getting into quite yet. There is a big party being thrown by my Royal Dance Court group on Saturday, so much of my day had to be reserved for setting up for that event. I personally don’t think that the setup will take super long, so I may have tons of free time once it is finished. But because I reserved the afternoon for this, everything else I do on Saturdays got bumped, and I mistakenly never rescheduled those items. So… we’ll have to see what happens! Maybe I will have a ton of extra practice time! There’s a lot of stuff I should be working on perfecting, so it’s not like that is a terrible idea. I’ll let you know next week how things go!

Then again, if nothing else comes up, I could always spend that extra time drawing up plans for my dance workout program, right?

I’m So Powerful, I Don’t Need Batteries To Play

Oh man, a second post this week? I must have all sorts of free time if I am able to write so much! Either that or I did something dance-related that I need to remember in the future. I’ll give you a little hint: it’s the latter.

Let’s start off chronologically though, since that works best for my brain when I have to review things later. The first thing I did that is worth remembering was my lesson with Sparkledancer and Sir Steven on Saturday afternoon. We took our time together to work on continuing to try to improve our dancing based on the review notes that we got back from the judges the weekend prior. This week we focused exclusively on Foxtrot. The specific notes that Sir Steven wanted to have us work on were the two that read “Knees need to flex more when receiving the weight on the slow; Slows need to be fuller to show contrast from quicks.”

We went about this in a weird manner. I think, now that I have had a few days to digest what was going on, that I kind of understand what Sir Steven was trying to get Sparkledancer and I to do, but I was really confused by the method during our time together. Parts of it just felt wrong, and went counter to a lot of the techniques for moving in Foxtrot that I have been working on for so long, which may have been what brought on most of my confusion.

What we were doing saw us just using a simple Feather and Three Step combination while we took steps. Sir Steven wanted us to work on really driving as we took the first step, and then taking the last two steps of the figures with straight legs. Yup, you read that right, straight legs, like in a Latin dance. Obviously practicing the steps like this slowly will easily fix the issue of taking the steps with my knees bent, which makes it look like I never fully straighten my legs while moving, but how we were doing it also added significant rise to the figure, which is something I was told to never do. Remember in the past when I told you about Lord Dormamu’s theory of Foxtrot, described as a body of water? Yeah, adding ‘waves’ to my Foxtrot completely goes against that theory.

The whole lesson was spent pretty much like this, first using slow Feather and Three Step combinations, then moving up to slowly walking through our routine and applying the same action. Again, it felt weird to me, but Sir Steven thought that it helped by the time we were near completed for the day. As my luck would have it, as we were nearing the end of our lesson, the Princess arrived at the Fancy Dance Hall. She had a coaching session scheduled with a client at that location Saturday afternoon. While she was waiting for her client to arrive, Sir Steven asked her if she would want to watch Sparkledancer and I do our Foxtrot routine, to see if she could see improvements.

So we danced for her, then we had to stop and show her the notes from the judges that we were actually working on, then we had to dance for her again once she was on the same page. Her take on the proper approach in order to fix our issues was completely different from Sir Steven’s take. The Princess told me that I was basically off time when taking the slow steps in each figure, and that is what was causing all of the issues I was having. She had actually sat and watched a private coaching session with that world champion judge guy and a different male student of the Fancy Dance Hall where the judge tried to help the student fix the same problem she saw me doing.

To make the explanation easier, it turns out she had  grabbed a video of the world champion guy and this student dancing the same steps in Foxtrot side-by-side, and she forwarded the video to me so that I could have a copy to refer to. Watching the two men dance the same figures was enlightening. Though the music is playing and they start each figure on the same beat, it looks like the male student is off time compared to the world champion. On his slow steps in each figure, the judge always takes the weight onto his moving leg on beat two, whereas I (and the male student in the video) tend to transfer from leg to leg on beat one, so it looks like we are rushing even if the next two steps are on time.

The Princess told me that if I were to work on fixing my timing to look more like the world champion guy in the video, that would help fix my issues. For one, it would definitely improve the timing contrast between the slow and quick steps in each figure. But the best way to really make sure that I transfer weight later in each slow is to continue to stretch through my legs longer, which means that likely I will take bigger steps, fully extending my legs in the process, and since the legs are spread farther I will have to really pull my legs together, which will require flexing my knees, at the end of the slow step.

So… no problem, right? I should be able to fix that easily! Sigh… I just know that this is going to probably take me hours of repetition with each figure in my routine, likely danced with really slow music playing to force me to slow down and think about every single step. Sounds like soooo much fun. 😛

I finally managed to meet up with my coach Lord Dormamu this past Saturday as well. He’s been out either competing or running competitions the last several weekends in a row, so the last time I saw him was the first of last month, if I remember correctly. When we got together, we had a lot of things to talk about because of all the stuff that has happened over the prior three weeks.

The first thing that he wanted to sit and review with Sparkledancer and I were the feedback notes that we received from the judges, the same notes I had just shown to the Princess. In general, he seemed rather pleased with what he saw. There weren’t any notes that any of the judges had written that Lord Dormamu wasn’t already working on with us, and he was happy with the notes that we got about how we were fun to watch and had charisma. As Lord Dormamu put it, there is no way that he could teach either Sparkledancer or I to dance with charisma, that is something you either have or you don’t, so he was delighted that the judges thought we had it.

The next major thing we had to discuss was what Sparkledancer and I should be working toward next. It’s always nice to have something on the calendar to work toward, so we talked about what competitions that each of us knew were in the near future in the Dance Kingdom. We settled on one that is coming up around the end of April as our next event, and even talked about several that were coming up shortly after that which we should seriously consider. The one in April I’m feeling fairly good about, since it’s less than an hour away and it’s on a weekend, so there aren’t any conflicts to consider. Some of the others involve a bit more travel, so Sparkledancer and I will have to discuss those to see if we can both make it work with our work schedules.

Business out of the way, we started to look at dancing, and since we had the comments from the judges handy, Lord Dormamu had us start right at the top of the list with Waltz and the first two notes I wrote out last week (More rise and fall actions need developing; More lowering and rising). This was another one of those instances where Lord Dormamu thought of a different way to explain the mechanics of a certain dance technique to me so that I could understand how to apply the concept more easily.

Rising is the easy part, and he didn’t think that I needed to work on that at all this past weekend. It was actually the lowering action that I was doing when Sparkledancer and I demonstrated our Waltz for him that he thought needed the work. Over the years, I was taught by several people that when lowering, I should be bending my standing leg kind of like I was doing a single-leg squat (i.e. going straight down). Doing things in this manner does give the illusion of me lowering, but it also kills my movement in the process. If he were to let us advance to higher-level figures where we bring our feet together less often, this would become very problematic.

What he actually wants to see when I lower is my knees to come forward without moving my foot/feet, to the point where I would need to lift my heels off the ground. I got taken over to a wall to practice this action. Standing with my arms out in front of me on the wall, I was told to bring my knees forward and bend my elbows to alloy my body to move toward the wall. This is the feeling that lowering in the Waltz should give me every time I do it

When moving forward, this action will have me driving my body into my partner before even moving my feet. If I am going backward, the forward drive from my partner is a definite signal that I need to be preparing my leg backward to take the next step, because if I don’t then she just runs into me. And my body is fairly solid, so if I make my partner run into me, it’s probably going to hurt. Promenade Position is obviously a little different. If you rotate to Promenade Position properly by turning your nose and toes, the falling action will have both partners’ knees moving forward in the same direction.

We also talked briefly about two other points on the list (Beautiful closing action on the natural turn. More consistent with this; Closing action in natural turn could be more precise). When we danced through the routine for Lord Dormamu, he thought that our Natural Turns looked really good, but he wasn’t at the competition we did to see what the judges saw that day. He assumed they were talking about us closing our feet together with one foot being in front of the other, like you should see in Tango, but not in Waltz.

His advice to make our closing action on the Natural Turn (and any other place where we close our feet together) more precise was to not think about bringing our feet together, but just to think about bringing the toes of our feet together. For most people who aren’t pigeon toed, they can’t bring their toes together without the rest of their feet being together without a lot of difficulty. According to him, if that was really the issue the judges were referring to, focusing on just that small change should fix the precision issue pretty quickly.

Class on Monday night was pretty small, with only four of us showing up to attend Latin Technique. Even though that meant my vote counted for 25% of the total, I still got outvoted and we worked on Samba that night. Yay……………. Can you feel my excitement? Does it come through the screen like a slap in the face? Probably not. I’m too nice to slap you!

The big competition that Lord Junior and his students are preparing for is this coming weekend, so in class we were reviewing some figures that Veep uses in her Silver Samba routine with Lord Junior. The pattern itself was pretty simple footwork-wise: we started off by doing three Reverse Turns, but later in class Lord Junior cut that down to just one so that he could prevent us from traveling so far away from him. After the last (or only) Reverse Turn we did two Back Rocks, then a Plait, which is essentially the Samba equivalent of Chicken Walks you would see in various Swing dance styles. After the Plait we finished by bringing the lady across us to get back into dance position during one final Reverse Turn.

There were a couple of tricky points for me specifically during that lesson. First off, the Back Rocks. These aren’t like the rocking action you see in Tango, which is essentially what I tried to do the first time through the figure. There is about a quarter-turn of rotation in the course of the Back Rock, and a little slide action with the front foot when you shift your hips forward. So it’s actually like you step back with an 8th of a turn rotation and shift your hips back, slide your other foot forward and to the outside a little to do another 8th of a turn as you shift your hips forward, and then shift your hips back over the standing leg again to prepare for the next figure. I kept wanting to pick my front foot up instead of sliding it for some reason, which was bad.

Next up, the Plait. The first couple of times through the figure, when I would take that delayed action step backward onto the ball of my foot with my heel off the ground, I was letting my knees track in the direction that my toes were pointed, mostly because that was comfortable for me. Lord Junior stopped me and made me redo the step action and bring my knee inward while twisting my foot so that I could step on the inside edge with my toes till pointed outward. Yikes. Luckily we were near a mirror, so I could walk through it a few times while watching to see what I was doing.

Finally, there was Ms. Possible. Yes, she was one of the tricky parts for me that night. I have real trouble dancing with Ms. Possible for some reason, and apparently it is always my fault. I know I’m not a Latin competitor, so obviously I have trouble with techniques I don’t use all the time, but as soon as she hears that I am doing something wrong, like with my knees in the Plait, that ends up being the whole reason that she can never do the figure successfully with me. Even after I step through things enough to fix what I was doing wrong. Even after Lord Junior stops her to tell her that she is doing parts of the figures wrong. Even though I can switch partners and dance through the same choreography with Veep with no trouble at all. Nope, Ms. Possible still blames me, loud enough for everyone in the studio to hear.

I wonder if that has anything to do with the fact that Sparkledancer and I have directly competed against her and her amateur partner a few times at this point, and we always do better than the two of them. Maybe she is holding a grudge against me for that? I don’t know. I like to believe I am nice, so I don’t know why she would treat me like that. The other guy in class Monday night had trouble the same choreography with her as well, but she never blamed him for it like she was doing with me. Hmm… what can I do to make her my friend again? I’ll have to think about this for a bit.

Standard Technique class was also used by Lord Junior to give Veep some extra practice on a section of one of her routines. Hopefully all the extra practice he worked in for her will result in awesome scores this weekend when she competes! The routine they had been working on in their lesson that day was her Open Waltz routine, and there were a couple of fairly challenging figures back-to-back that she needed to perfect.

The two figures in question were variations on more basic figures that people who have done International Waltz before have likely gone through. We started the set with a basic Chasse from Promenade Position just to build up some momentum to carry us through the turns at the end. I believe the technical name of the next figure would be ‘Overspin from a Quick Open Reverse Turn.’ You take an Open Reverse Turn (which is a Reverse Turn where you pass your feet at the end), add in an extra syncopated step at the beginning because you are starting on the wrong foot when finishing the Chasse From Promenade Position, then add a Reverse Pivot at the end.

Sounds pretty simple, right? Well, if that was too easy for you, we connected onto the end of that a Overspin from a Double Reverse Spin. Take the Double Reverse Spin, which is arguably the most difficult figure in the Bronze syllabus for Waltz (and Quickstep), and then add on a Reverse Pivot to the end of that too. That’s why I mentioned using the Chasse from Promenade Position to create momentum – the Chasse and the first couple of steps of the Quick Open Reverse Turn are the only traveling that you get to do. Once you start the first Reverse Pivot, and then for the entire Overspin from a Double Reverse Spin, you will barely cover any ground.

The big trick to getting all the turns at the end to work properly is for the ladies to keep their bodies (especially their heads) out to the left. You may have heard that advice once or twice if you are a lady that dances International Standard often. With the head weight on the outside of the circle as we try to turn, it helps us get all the way around. If the lady straightens up and puts her head over her feet, then it becomes a struggle to get the turns to rotate as much as they need to. As you can guess, each of the Reverse Pivots we did was supposed to rotate 180° to set us up for the next figure, so killing the rotation would also hurt whatever figure we would go into afterward.

I think it’s going to be a quiet weekend around the rest of the Dance Kingdom since so many people will be congregating at the Dance Death Arena for this weekend’s Pro/Am competition extravaganza. I thought about offering my time to help out behind the scenes as a volunteer for the event, but then I realized that if everyone was gone, I could get in a bunch of practice without having to share floorspace. The last couple of weeks the dance floors where I normally practice have been filled with people taking extra lessons to get ready for this competition, so I have had to keep my own practice contained, or only work on small sections to avoid running into anyone.

If you are competing this weekend, good luck! I hope that you manage to kick some names and take some ass, or however that saying normally goes. I’ll give you a high-five for every heat that you win if you happen to be nearby. My arms are only so long, so I have a limited range of where my high fives can be received from, but I’ll make an effort!

Banging On A Kettledrum Won’t Make You Notice Me

I know you’re probably mostly interested this week in hearing about the competition that I just finished, so I promise that I’ll talk about that first…

Last Saturday was a busy day for me. I spent most of the day out at the Dance Death Arena to compete. This was another one of those competitions where, as an amateur, once I paid the entry fee I could register to dance in as many different rounds as I wanted. I signed up to take part in the same rounds that I had done during the last competition I had gone to the Dance Death Arena for back in the beginning of October. That meant I would be doing four different two-dance rounds that day.

Also just like the last competition that I did at the Dance Death Arena, two of the rounds that I danced in had practically no competition, and the other two were super contested. This time around, Sparkledancer and I had only one person dancing against us in the low turnout rounds. With only two couples registered and a big floor, they put in dancers from a couple of other categories to make better use of the space (and the judge’s time).

The other two rounds I did though… those were nuts. When the rounds finally showed up on the board listing the numbers of all the competitors, I think there were twenty-four couples listed in one, and twenty in the other. Because the rounds were so big, they had been divided up into Quarter-Finals, Semi-Finals and Finals, and then the Quarter-Final round also had to be split in half to give the judges a chance to see and evaluate everyone properly.

One thing that they offered at this competition that I had not seen before, was the ability for people to sign up to dance in a category without a registered partner. There were a number of people registered that had a partner listing of “TBA” and it took me a bit to figure out what that was all about. These individuals weren’t allowed to dance solo, since no solo proficiency rounds were offered during this competition, but anyone who wanted to compete could find a partner just before taking the floor and dance if they wanted to.

President Porpoise was actually at this competition offering his services throughout the day for any ladies that needed a last-minute partner. Being the experienced dance host that he is, he thought it would be a nice way to volunteer to help out at the competition. The last competition I saw him volunteering at, he was stuck at a table checking people in. This job seemed to suit him much better. He’s such a presidential guy… this is why everyone votes for him.

Let’s get this out of the way before I get any farther – I did very well at the competition, even better than I did at the last competition I did at the Dance Death Arena. They gave out ribbons at this competition for everyone that was sixth place or above, so I got four ribbons to take home as a souvenir. Good job me!

I mention the ribbons because they are kind of funny… I noticed the day after the competition that half the ribbons that I received had the name of a completely different competition printed on the front of them. When I saw that, I took a picture and sent it over to Sparkledancer to show her. Turns out that three of the four ribbons she took home had the name of this other competition too! I can’t find any information online about this other competition, so I wonder if these are just recycled ribbons from an old competition that no longer exists? That struck me as funny for some reason.

There are a couple of interesting points of note I want to mention about this competition so I can reflect on them later. First off, a serious note about my scores: I managed to see the breakdown of how I scored with each judge. For the most part, all the judges rated Sparkledancer and I the same as the place that we got at the end of the day, which explains why we took home ribbons with those place numbers when we left. However, there was one judge that rated us last in every round we danced, which is a huge discrepancy when compared with all the other scores we got.

Since finding that out, I’ve been wracking my brain to try to figure out why this judge would do that. Did the judge just not like the way that I looked? Did I offend him in some way early on in the day, and thus he always rated me last? Was there something technical about my dancing that he thought I was doing wrong compared to everyone else?  It’s too bad I didn’t get a chance to ask the judge (if they would have allowed me to do that). I would have loved to know the reason why his marks were so different from all the other judges’ marks.

Funny note now: in between every few adult rounds they would do a round of junior dancers, which is always fun to watch. Many of these kids are barely half my height, and they are already way better than me at dancing. It makes me wish that I had started out at that age…

Anyway, I was in line waiting for one of my heats to begin when they had these little kids out doing a four dance International Latin final. They started out with a Cha-Cha, then did a Samba. Next up, the emcee announced that all of these young dancers would do “the dance of friendship.” When the DJ put on a Rumba, the whole crowd started to laugh. Apparently when you are that young, judges don’t expect to see any romance in your Rumba. Too funny. I’m going to start referring to Rumba as the dance of friendship whenever it comes up in conversation to see if anyone notices.

After driving back home, unpacking all my stuff from my car and sitting down momentarily to take a few deep breaths, I left the house again to head out to a dance party. My Royal Dance Court group was putting on an event that night, and though I was tired out from driving all over the place all day, I knew that I would be needed for a short while at this party.

I got to the venue a few minutes after the lesson we had planned had started. The big reason that I thought it would be good for me to be there was that my Royal Dance Court group had planned on bringing in someone to teach a lesson on American Viennese Waltz. Knowing that not many people feel comfortable with Viennese Waltz at first because they think it is so fast, I thought it would be prudent for me to jump into the lesson to help guide any ladies who were struggling through the footwork.

As I walked through the door and took a moment to assess the situation, I was pulled into a different problem that had nothing to do with the group class that was going on. The DJ was having trouble getting the equipment that they had brought in hooked up into the existing sound system at the venue. Apparently the DJ had played at this venue before and had no trouble, but that was because a specific cable had been plugged into the back of the sound system control box that would easily plug everything into the DJ’s setup. That cable as nowhere to be found.

Being male, and having plugged in enough stereo equipment in my youth to know a thing or two, I went over to see if I could help. I had already arrived late, I figured that if I could get the DJ to tell me what kind of cable was missing, I could run out and pick one up if needed. The problem with that plan was that the DJ couldn’t give me a good description of what the end of the cable looked like, so I had to wedge myself behind the stereo cabinet and look at all the inputs myself.

While back there, I found one cable lying along the floor that wasn’t plugged into anything. I moved it out of the way to avoid accidentally stepping on the cord and breaking it while I looked at the inputs. When I did that, the DJ reached down and picked it up. There was some sort of adapter on both ends of this cable, and when those were pulled off, it turned out to be the type input plug that was needed.

Once I was told that was what everyone had been looking for, I helped get the cable plugged into the back of the stereo system, since I was already wedged back there anyway. When the DJ plugged in the other end, we were able to test everything and verify that we were getting sound from the speakers. First crisis of the night averted! Hooray!

After extracting myself from behind the cabinet, I finally managed to get my dance shoes on. I surveyed the group class again. Sparkledancer had been watching the class while I was helping out with the sound system, and she pointed out to me that there were several ladies that didn’t have partners in the back corner of the room that were struggling with getting their footwork right.

The instructor was just going through the basic Reverse and Natural Turns at the moment, so I jumped in and worked with a couple of the ladies in practice frame to help them get their steps down. Prez told me later that she thought that I had the patience of a saint for working through the figures slowly with those ladies who were struggling.

Most of the lesson centered around just doing Reverse and Natural Turns and Change Steps, since those figures are pretty much a requirement for getting around the room. In the last ten minutes, the instructor went over a figure that would actually be considered American Viennese Waltz. After a half Reverse Turn, we would then do a Cross Body Lead with Underarm Turn, releasing the lady to open up into Side-by-Side Fan Position.

Next he had everyone do that classic move where you bring the lady back toward you so that you can meet up in the middle palm-to-palm – or you could rub noses, or kiss (if you were really good friends) – before opening back up to Side-by-Side Fan again. In place of the standard ending, the instructor had us do something more like Tango Swivels, where we would turn to face each other and point the right leg (left leg for the ladies) to the side, then step forward, collect the lady back into frame and point the left leg (right leg for ladies) to the side, and then we could start up with the Reverse Turns again.

This last piece seems fairly simple if you’ve done any American Viennese Waltz before… based on my description, you may be able to picture exactly what it looks like in your head. They are fairly common movements. However, when we were all given the last part of class to practice, I found even more ladies that were struggling to figure out what their footwork should be. I did my best to try to help out as many as I could, but I didn’t manage to get to all of them before class was over unfortunately.

The DJ didn’t play many more Viennese Waltz songs than normal than night – maybe one or two extra over the two or three you would hear at an average party – so there wasn’t really much opportunity for people to practice what they learned. One of the first songs that the DJ did play was a super slow Viennese Waltz, which everyone got out on the floor to do, but the later songs that were more normal tempo didn’t see as many participants. Ah well, hopefully this class took some of the fear out of the dance style for these people.

Sunday afternoon I met up with Sir Steven and Sparkledancer for our normal weekend lesson. With the competition over, it is time to buckle down and get super-serious about the showcase performance coming up. After all, it is less than a month away to opening night!

Before we even started to go over the choreography, Sir Steven had to talk with us about the show. It turns out that one of the instructors from the Fancy Dance Hall had some kind of project at their day job that had to be scheduled for the performance weekend, so he wasn’t going to be able to dance in the production! The other male instructors were going to take over dancing the routines that had been prepared with his female students, but there were a few holes in the storyline of the show where this instructor was going to be performing with one of the females on staff.

That was where Sparkledancer and I would come in. The Artistic Director of the show had asked Sir Steven if we could move our performance to fill in one of those holes in the plot. They had a different act that could easily take over the spot where we were going to be originally plus the next plot point, so one number could be eliminated. However, there was a pivotal moment in the story that was still missing which our number could be used for without changing too much of the choreography.

This would mean that other things about the act would have to change though… our costumes, for one, are going to have to be  completely different. I had only gotten two pieces for mine so far, so that wouldn’t be too hard for me to accommodate. The portrayal is the other thing though. Sparkledancer and I had talked about doing this number to work on portraying an emotion during our dancing. Since I am generally a happy and comedic person, we had wanted to try dancing something somber and sad.

Taking our routine and moving it to this new slot means that it is no longer going to portray a sad part of the story. In fact, the part that it fits now would be mostly happy, with a bittersweet ending. Still… I said that moving the routine would be fine, and Sparkledancer agreed as well, so for now that’s the new, new plan. One of these days I hope to actually get to talk to the Artistic Director, but we haven’t both been at the Fancy Dance Hall at the same time in quite a while, so that just hasn’t happened.

By the time we finished our lesson that day, Sir Steven had mapped out what he said would be the first half of the routine. There is a bit of an intro that still needs to be put together, but that piece will involve knowing where one of the set pieces will be placed, and no one has marked that spot on the dance floor yet. Combined with the section that uses that ‘Horse and Cart’ figure and the ending with the big lift, I’m not sure how much of the choreography we still have left to learn.

Sparkledancer and I actually timed out what we have already during our practice session earlier this week, and from that clock it feels like we still have a lot more that needs to be added. The big piece that Sir Steven gave us that he said comprised ‘the first half’ of the routine is barely 42 seconds when danced to the tempo of the song. That seems… short.

The ‘Horse and Cart’ piece doesn’t seem to be safely workable to the song’s tempo, with the number of steps we were given and the way Sparkledancer was told to stretch her arms… it feels too frantic, and trying to move my feet so fast involves me taking tiny steps. However, if we manage to use the figure as I was told it should be, that only adds another eight seconds. Unless we are looking for our routine to be only a minute and-a-half, it feels like we need quite a bit more.

We’ll talk about it with Sir Steven come Saturday and see what his vision for the rest of the choreography looks like…

Because of the holiday this week, the group class that I normally go to on Wednesday night was cancelled, so the last thing that I did this week was go out to Monday night’s Latin Technique class. As class was getting started, Lord Junior gave us all the option to do either Samba or Cha-Cha, and I was the most vocal in my choice of doing Cha-Cha, so that’s what we did. Before I went to class, I had gone to work out and done mostly plyometric exercises, so while neither Samba or Cha-Cha sounded particularly ideal to me, Cha-Cha seemed like the least-worst choice to me.

We warmed up by practicing Lock Steps slowly. After some explanation about the specific things that Lord Junior wanted each of us to focus on (for me it was making sure to put my heels down at the right time), we did sets of three going forward and backward on our own. Next we partnered up and did the same thing, with the men traveling backward for the first set of three and forward for the second, and the women doing the opposite.

After Lord Junior felt like we had warmed up sufficiently with Lock Steps, he wanted to have us all go through an exercise that he had been doing with a student of his right before class started. This exercise had us doing Three-Step Turns to the right and then back to the left on our own. This was a figure he wanted to use in the choreography we would do during class, so he wanted to make sure everyone could do it well before we started on that.

The final bit of choreography mostly consisted of adding together our Lock Step practice with the Three-Step Turn. With both partners facing each other and our weight on the right leg (ladies on their left), we did one Hand To Hand and then did three Lock Steps with both partners traveling forward. At the end of those three we changed sides and did another Hand To Hand. Coming back we only did two Lock Steps traveling forward and then squared up with our partner to do a basic chasse to the right (ladies to the left).

At the end of the chasse we did a New Yorker to the man’s right side, then pivoted back 180° to go right into a Three-Step Turn. At the end we would catch hands with our partner, do a New Yorker to the man’s left side, pivot around again and finish with another Three-Step Turn. The goal was to make sure at the end that we finished up being solid and balanced and on time with the music.

Most of the class was spent rotating partners and just practicing this simple choreography with the music. However, the first time that Lord Junior rotated through the ladies to dance with Bony, something funny happened… I was dancing, so I didn’t see what actually happened, but suddenly from the other side of the room I hear Bony yell out “Turn!” Lord Junior starts laughing then and says really loudly “Bony! You’re supposed to actually turn there, not just yell ‘Turn!’”

That made the whole class break out into laughter for a little while. Lord Junior ended up telling us all that we needed to go through that round again with the same partners so that he could see if his partner could turn correctly on her second try. Good times.

Look at me, posting things on a holiday! I must be really dedicated to this, or something. I hope that everyone manages to get out dancing this weekend to burn off all those extra calories. I know that I’ll be out somewhere this weekend. There is at least one dance party I know about going on, and I think I have some dance lessons scheduled, and for sure I’ll be getting in some practice time. The dancing never ends!