You’re Crazy And I’m Out Of My Mind

Last Saturday afternoon I headed out to meet up with Sir Steven and Sparkledancer for our regularly scheduled lesson. After Sir Steven had Sparkledancer and I run through all of our International Standard routines except Viennese Waltz to warm up, we looked at a couple of specific things that day which were different from the things we had worked on the last couple of weeks.

First up, we went back to Foxtrot to walk around for a bit. In the last several months Sparkledancer and I have done a lot of practice walking back and forth from one side of a dance floor to the other in Foxtrot. This is the major way we’ve both practiced moving backwards and forwards. Oftentimes we’ve done this by traveling down the floor using repeating Three Step and Feather combinations. This time, Sir Steven wanted us to work on walking, but he wanted us to be up on our toes the whole time, to simulate the steps we would take while doing foot rise, like the steps in a Progressive Chasse or a Weave. This was because Sir Steven wanted the steps we would take during both the Basic Weave and Natural Weave in our routine to cover as much distance as the steps we take for other figures. We practiced moving forward and backward while having our heels off the ground, separately then together, adding this as another exercise to do during practice.

Next we switched over to Tango to work on something that ended up being amusing, at least to me. Sir Steven spent some time working with Sparkledancer on changing the position she gets her left arm into when in dance frame for Tango. Sir Steven wanted Sparkledancer to start wrapping her arm more around mine, hooking her thumb underneath my arm and pulling it upward to lock her arm in place. The problem was that she couldn’t hold the position very well – her hand kept slipping upward as she pulled her hand in that direction. Sir Steven tried to get into this position with her to see if he could figure out why this was happening, but she had no problem keeping her arm where it was supposed to be with him. The two of them struggled with things for a while, and eventually they gave up and Sir Steven told her to work on it during practice so that we didn’t spend all our time on one thing.

After our lesson was over and Sparkledancer and I were walking out of the studio toward our cars in the parking lot, Sparkledancer confided in me that she thinks the reason why she was having issues holding her hand in place while in frame with me and not with Sir Steven was because his arms are tiny compared to mine. It is harder for her to wrap her arm around mine and hook her thumb underneath to begin with, and because my arms are not squishy, her hand basically slides upward around my triceps as she pulls upward. On Sir Steven, she can wrap her arm around his arm easily because his arms are smaller. Also, because his arms are not as muscular as mine, as she hooks her thumb beneath his arm and pulls upward she can press into his arm and create a bit of a groove where her thumb can rest to stay in place.

Sigh… it seems like I just have all kinds of dance issues that I don’t think anyone else I’ve ever met has to worry about.

Saturday night I got to go out and do something different for a change – still dance related, but not involving the grind that dance practice has become for me lately. I got to go out and chaperone a local high school prom again. This is something that I volunteered to help Sparkledancer with several years ago, and the people in charge actually accepted me. I guess that since, unlike a lot of other volunteers they get, I have had to have lots of different background checks in my life because of things I’ve done for work in the past, they actually considered me to be fairly trustworthy. I’ve been asked if I would come back and help again every year since then, and I’ve agreed. It’s a nice bit of volunteer work, and usually I get to dance a little bit as the night goes on, so it’s right up my alley.

This year the prom was held at a different venue than they had used the last three years. The place was an actual event center, and the room they had rented out for the night was really big on the inside. The dance floor was smaller than I expected, but because they had decided to have other activities going on in the event hall to entertain the high school students this year, there was lots of space on the dance floor for everyone throughout the night. The kids all tended to cluster in the middle of the floor right in front of the DJ’s booth, leaving big empty spaces on the right and left sides of the floor. I was once again in charge of watching the dance floor for any ‘inappropriate dancing’, so I was standing in the corner on one side where I had lots of room to wiggle around as I watched the cluster of people in the middle. From what I saw, there was really only one incident on the dance floor all night that one of the chaperones had to stop because it looked lewd enough to make someone uncomfortable. I didn’t see it though, so I have no idea what happened.

I will say I wasn’t as big a fan of the DJ this year as I was of the people they brought in the last few years I have helped out at this event. Last year the DJ they had was more technologically advanced, and you could send a message from your phone to request songs (which I did several times that night, to entertain myself). The years before that the DJs played a lot more songs that I was able to dance to, so I moved around a lot while maintaining my vigil on the kids to make sure everyone was behaving. This year… well, the music wasn’t really the kind of music I could dance to. It was mostly music you would hear at a 21+ nightclub meant for drunken bumping and grinding… except that this was a high school prom, so (as far as I could tell) no one was drunk, and the kids were all too young to know how to grind properly. That’s probably why no one felt the need to stop the kids from “grinding” during the evening. The “grinding” they were doing mostly looked sad, not inappropriate.

Close to the end of the night, after many of the kids had left the venue to head off to their after-prom parties, the DJ finally started to play better music. My feet were hurting from standing in one place all night, so I was eager to move around a bit and get my blood flowing properly. Sparkledancer showed up at that point, relieved from whatever station she was chaperoning, and we danced together a bit on the now mostly-empty dance floor. We got to do a couple of Cha-Cha numbers, a Jive, and a Rumba – much to the amazement of the few kids still on the dance floor. They all kind of stopped whatever they were doing to watch us. The last song of the night that the DJ put on as the lights came up and the kids all went off to find their coats was a Foxtrot. It was a bit fast, so we opted to dance American Foxtrot. The few remaining volunteers and the DJ were the ones that stopped to watch us dance a couple of laps after the kids had all left, and as we left the floor after the song was over the DJ thanked us for helping to make the event “classier” than the rest of the evening had been. Yay!

On to more interesting topics… let’s talk about Latin Technique class this week. It was a small class for some reason. Only Ms. Possible, Bony and I had shown up. Lord Junior decided to have us spend some time working on speed and change-of-direction in class that day, and we used Cha-Cha to accomplish that. The change-of-direction part was easy enough, but it was leg day for me when I worked out earlier (never skip leg day!), so my legs were tired and I think my speed probably suffered a bit as a result. I managed to get through things with the music as we increased the tempo throughout the night from about 60% up to normal, but I’m sure the closer we got to full speed the sloppier my legs would have looked if you had been there to watch.

The pattern we used started out with a basic chasse to the right, but after a few rounds we stopped doing that and started out standing on our right leg with the left leg pointed off to the side instead. From either start that we used, we then went into a normal New Yorker to the right, following that up with a Ronde that turned into a Press Line before taking a step to the left. Once the left foot was on the ground, we did an actual Ronde Chasse, rotating our bodies slightly at the end so that the last step was not a side step, but rather a step forward with our bodies turned out slightly to face away from our partner. Here we abruptly changed direction, rotating 180° without moving our feet. The turn wasn’t so bad, but since we did not do a rock step or anything after turning to kill the momentum we had when dancing closer to full tempo, the next movement was harder to go into while maintaining your balance.

After flipping around, the guys had it easy. We were just going to take two steps forward and one to the side. The ladies would do a Three Step Turn while we did that, and we used the side step at the end to line up with them and regain their hand before going into the next figure. I had to be careful with this section. For some reason I kept wanting to do a Three Step Turn as well. The progression worked if I did that, since I was able to link up with the lady at the end without issues, but I really wasn’t supposed to be doing that. Apparently I just like making things harder for myself for no apparent reason. No one seemed to notice when I accidentally turned though, so let’s just keep that as our secret, OK?

To finish things out, we did New Yorker on the left side, and then shifted our weight between our legs and back to left rather than doing a chasse. Then we did two New Yorkers with Cuban Break timing, first to the left then to the right. We did a final New Yorker to the left that was held for a whole measure to give everyone a chance to breathe. After the hold, both partners turned away from each other to basically walk around in a half-circle (counter-clockwise for the Leads, clockwise for the Follows). We took two steps, and then did a Lock Step starting with the left leg, then two more steps and another Lock Step, this time starting with the right leg. If done correctly, both partners should have met back up in the middle a couple of feet down the floor from where you started out.

Finally, let’s talk about what I got to do yesterday night in Standard Technique class. This week, Lord Junior wanted to work on the Outside Spin some more, but since we had already gone through the figure in Waltz last week in class Lord Junior wanted to change things up a bit. He decided that we were going to look at the figure in Foxtrot this week, and he wanted to make sure we added on a Ronde when coming out of the Outside Spin because he had so much fun doing the Ronde figures in Latin Technique class on Monday. After dancing through things himself a few times before starting class to figure out what he should make the timing in the Ronde figure to make it challenging for us, we got to work.

To start things out a little more gently than rushing straight into the Outside Spin, we began by facing diagonal wall and doing a Hover Telemark (which is the same footwork as a Twinkle from American Foxtrot) and went into an Open Natural Turn. That set us up nicely for the Outside Spin, and gave us a bit of momentum to work with to make the pivots and spins easier for everyone. At the end of the Outside Spin the Leads would lunge forward on their right leg, heading toward diagonal center, and rotate their body to lead the Followers through the Ronde that was mentioned earlier. Doing a Ronde like that in International Foxtrot is much more difficult than doing one in American Foxtrot. In American style you can split apart from each other and round out your arms in order to emphasize the turn and make the movement easier. In International style you are supposed to stay in frame the whole time, which includes maintaining body contact. This limits your lead when trying to lead the figure from your core instead, since most people can turn their arms slightly farther than their torso.

The Ronde was meant to be very slow, covering almost a whole three beats in the music. At the end of beat three the Leads finally shifted our weight back to the left leg and on beat four we brought the right foot down behind the left to do a small pivot, lining us up to face against the line of dance. Now we needed to turn around, since the force of our last movement was causing us to travel backwards. Lord Junior decided to keep things easy and add on a simple Open Telemark. The Heel Turn that the ladies were asked to do for this particular Open Telemark was probably the easiest Heel Turn that any of them had ever done. We were given the option of coming out either heading straight down the line of dance (i.e. no turn at all) or heading toward diagonal center (i.e. 1/8th of a turn). Finally, we could finish the whole progression by closing the Promenade through a Feather Ending, but oftentimes the lady would just stop dancing as soon as we took our first step in Promenade Position after the Open Telemark, ending the progression a bit more abruptly.

I’m still not entirely sure what I’m going to be doing this weekend. I had finally heard back from Lord Dormamu after class on Wednesday to say that he had set Sparkledancer and I up with coaching from some judge early Saturday afternoon, and that I should also be planning on some workshop for Saturday evening. The problem is that I had already been scheduled to take care of something for work mid-Saturday afternoon that I can’t get out of. Once I told Lord Dormamu that, he said that he would go back and discuss things with people, and let me know what Saturday looks like later. He never mentioned anything about whether or not I should plan on being in the competition he’s organizing on Sunday. I hope he lets me know soon – I had a friend ask me about something for Sunday, so if I’m going to dance I need to rearrange that as well. Sigh… I guess we’ll all have to wait and see what happens!

Advertisements

Tell Me Something Fun!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s